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American Outdoors Brands cited as a “stock to hold onto” for the next 50 years

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 12:01

A market analyst and financial writer said Friday the longevity of Smith & Wesson makes American Outdoor Brands stock worth holding onto for the next half century.

“The stock has jumped 25 percent over the last three months as Wall Street begins to realize it was wrong about a so-called Trump slump,” said Rich Duprey, a writer for the investment website The Motley Fool, in an article published Friday. “But with shares still deeply discounted, buying now will reward investors many times over 50 years from now.”

Duprey predicts although its share of gun revenue for American Outdoor Brands will dwindle as the company diversifies to include shooting sports and other aspects of “the rugged outdoors market,” the gun industry’s growth will not likewise fade.

“Political issues have a bearing on the timing of a purchase, but not on the continuing demand for guns,” he said. “That’s key because firearms sales remain on an upswing, and American Outdoor Brands is a cheap stock. It continues to trade at just 10 times earnings, 14 times next year’s estimates, at just a fraction of its expected earnings growth rate, and at a bargain-basement eight times free cash flow.”

Duprey cited a recent report from the National Shooting Sports Foundation that found target shooting participation increased 44 percent between 2009 and 2016 — proof that the sport appeals to a broader and broader demographic as time passes.

“New shooters are younger, are more female and increasingly diverse in ethnicity,” Larry Keane, NSSF’s general counsel, said in a blog post earlier this month. “The shooting sports are affordable, accessible, and more inclusive than ever before and people are taking full advantage. Even if the industry has room to become more welcoming and inclusive, our customer base is changing along with the American population. They are buying firearms and going to the range. All are welcome.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation processed 1.8 million applications through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System last month. Guns.com estimates about 926,000 guns were sold — nearly 57,000 more than May 2016, the busiest on record.

It continues a trend first noticed in March and sustained in April, when estimated sales eclipsed the previous year by 4,400.

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Categories: Gun News

Florida Sheriff: ‘Get a concealed firearms license and carry it’ (VIDEO)

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 11:42

Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd (Photo: Polk State College)

Another Florida sheriff is urging citizens to arm themselves and fight back if they should find themselves in an active shooter situation.

Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd told WFTS ABC News that while running and hiding can be a good option during some active shooter attacks, he hopes people will prepare if they should need to fight back themselves.

“If you’re not afraid of a gun, get one,” Judd said. “Become proficient. Get a concealed firearms license and carry it. And if you need to shoot somebody, shoot ‘em a lot.”

“The armed assailant doesn’t plan on you fighting back,” he said. “He plans on having a gun, doing all the shooting, and you’re just the sitting duck. Well, the ducks need to shoot back.”

Polk resident Mary Dailey disagrees with Sheriff Judd.

“That’s ridiculous, absolutely ridiculous,” Dailey said. “I’m all for your right to own a gun if you are a responsible person, but you should have to prove it.”

Judd’s statement came days after a fellow Florida law enforcement officer, Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey, made similar comments, calling on citizens to arm themselves and fight back in the event of another attack.

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Categories: Gun News

Survey: Gun owners and non-owners think alike when it comes to background checks

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 11:31

A majority of Americans who own guns and those who do not each support background checks for private gun sales, according to a survey released Thursday.

The Pew Research Center polled 3,390 adults in April and May about their attitudes toward and experiences with firearms. While the divide on policy issues appears wider than ever on most points — banning “assault-style” weapons and high capacity magazines, allowing concealed carry in more places and arming teachers — the two groups unite on the background check question.

About one-third of those surveyed identified as gun owners, Pew said, and of those, 77 percent said background checks should be required for private sales and at gun shows. Some 87 percent of non-owners agreed.

Nearly nine out of 10 respondents from each group also agreed on banning “the mentally ill” from buying guns.

When dividing owners by political affiliation, the support for denying gun ownership to those with mental illness holds strong across party lines: 88 percent of both Republican and Democrat owners support the prohibition.

Of those owners who identify as Republican or lean right, 70 percent support expanded background checks. Some 88 percent of Democrat or lean left owners agree.

The survey found gun owners’ partisan leanings also coincide with certain behaviors and ideological attitudes about the Second Amendment.

“Republican handgun owners are more likely than their Democratic counterparts to say they carry their gun with them, even if only some of the time (63 percent vs. 45 percent),” Pew said. “Fully 55 percent of Democrats who own a handgun say they never carry.”

The survey found Republican owners twice as likely — 91 percent to 43 percent — to say owning a gun is “essential to their freedom.”

Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, said the poll results should worry the National Rifle Association, which continues “to oppose popular gun safety policies like background check laws and pushes to dismantle permitting standards for who can carry a hidden, loaded gun in public.”

“Overall, these results are another encouraging sign for the overwhelming majority of us who know we can do more to reduce the unacceptable rates of gun violence we have in this country,” Watts said Friday.

The NRA did not respond to Guns.com’s request for comment Friday.

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Categories: Gun News

‘Pizzagate’ gunman gets 4 years for assaulting restaurant with AR-15

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 10:55

Pizzagate gunman Edgar Maddison Welch gave himself up to police in Washington D.C. (Photo: AP)

A North Carolina man was sentenced Thursday to four years in prison on charges related to him assaulting a Washington, D.C. pizza restaurant with an AR-15 rifle and revolver, the Justice Department said in a news release.

Edgar Maddison Welch, 29, pleaded guilty on March 24 to the related charges of interstate transportation of a firearm and ammunition and assault with a dangerous weapon. In addition to the four year prison term, Welch was also sentenced to three years of supervised release.

The incident occurred on Dec. 4 after Welch transported three loaded firearms from North Carolina to Washington. The guns included a 9mm AR-15 rifle loaded with approximately 29 rounds of ammunition, a fully-loaded, six-shot, .38-caliber revolver, and a loaded shotgun with additional shotgun shells.

Welch drove to the Comet Ping Pong pizza restaurant in northwest D.C., armed himself with the AR-15 and revolver, and marched inside the restaurant. Employees and customers, including children, scattered and fled the building. Welch then tried to pry open a locked door with a butter knife and shot the door multiple times with his rifle.

Minutes later, an employee unaware of the attack came into the restaurant. Welch pointed the rifle at the employee but did not shoot. The worker fled and left Welch alone in the restaurant. Eventually, Welch exited the establishment as well, leaving his firearms behind. He was then arrested, and no one was injured in the attack.

Evidence presented by the government showed that Welch was in part motivated by a fake news story that claimed Comet Ping Pong housed a child sex ring visited by Washington elites, such as Hillary and Bill Clinton.

Welch learned of the “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory on Dec. 1, just days before the incident. Welch watched YouTube videos on the conspiracy and also read related articles on non-credible websites.

The “Pizzagate” conspiracy was created in early November 2016 after James Alefantis, the owner of Comet’s and a supporter of the Democratic party, was found in a Clinton Campaign email released by Wikileaks. The creators of the fake news story then took to social media and found photos of the restaurant’s interior, which showed innocent pictures of children and art lining the walls.

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Categories: Gun News

FireField launches set of Stronghold Bipods for shooting stabilization

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 10:48

The Stronghold Bipod series aims to tackle a variety of shooting situations with its versatile design. (Photo: FireField)

FireField introduced a set of Stronghold Bipods designed to help precision shooters, big hame hunters and range goers find a little stability while slinging lead.

The Stronghold Bipod series consists of three models — a 6-9-inch, 11-16-inch and 15-22.5-inch. The multiple lengths allow for customizable adjustments to fit an array of shooting situations.

All three models come equipped with a tensioning adjustment lever that allows for quick and easy adjustments. The bipod family offers a newly designed tilt and swivel function, giving shooters the ability to adjust the bipod based on terrain. The bipods are also outfitted with rubber feet for maximum shooting stability.

The Stronghold Bipod lineup ships with a Picatinny mount adapter for shooters with Picatinny rail equipped firearms. The mount adapter permits easier mounting of the bipod to the firearm using the rail.

Topping off the bipods’ features is a padded stock mount which funcinons to keep firearms’ scuff and scratch-free.

The Stronghold Bipod series starts at $59.99.

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Categories: Gun News

Brooklyn man gets 20 years for broad daylight murder over drug money

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 10:45

A federal judge sentenced a 24-year-old Brooklyn man to spend more than two decades in prison for the broad daylight murder of man last year that prosecutors say was fueled by the defendant’s greed.

Rayshawn “Smooth” Demosthene pleaded guilty in December murdering Michael Morris on a Brooklyn street as well as being a felon in possession of a firearm. He was sentenced to 244 months in prison followed by five years of supervised release.

According to the indictment, Demosthene and co-defendant Jammar “Panama” Lipsett conspired to kill Morris in order to steal about $30,000 in cash, which was to be used to buy drugs.

“Murder, no matter what the circumstances, can never be tolerated in a civilized society,” said NYPD Commissioner James P. O’Neill.

Demosthene made arrangements to meet Morris, who lived in Virginia at the time of his murder, in New York for what Morris believed to be a $30,000 drug deal. However, Demosthene never intended to sell any drugs to Morris and the entire ordeal was nothing more than a ruse.

As Morris sat in a vehicle that was parked on a residential street in Brooklyn, waiting to engage in the transaction, Demosthene walked up to the vehicle and opened fire, fatally striking Morris in the head. Demosthene then took Morris’ money.

“The defendant and his co-conspirators committed a cold-blooded, ambush murder of the victim in order to steal money the victim intended to use to purchase narcotics. In the process, they turned the streets into a shooting gallery, endangering the lives of any number of innocent bystanders,” said ATF Special Agent-in-Charge Ashan M. Benedict. “This investigation highlights the ever-present danger of violence that goes along with the narcotics trade, and how invariably that violence plays out on the streets.”

Lipsett’s trial is ongoing.

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Categories: Gun News

Suspect fatally shot by partner in crime in burglary gone bad

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 10:11

James Robert Young, Jr. died from a single gunshot to the head Monday morning during a residential burglary. (Photo: Bibb County Sheriff’s Office)

A 41-year-old man was killed by his accomplice during a mishap as the two attempted to burglarize a home in Bibb County, Georgia, Monday morning.

The deceased man was identified by the Bibb County Sheriff’s Office as James Robert Young, Jr., of Macon. His accomplice, who remains at large, was identified as 16-year-old Aurie Mathis.

According to the sheriff’s office, Young and Mathis broke into the home just before 10 a.m., but they were interrupted by the homeowner, who yelled at them as they made their way to the front door.

Young was carrying a television that belonged to the homeowner but dropped it before he got to the door. At that point, Mathis, who was armed with a handgun, turned and fired a single shot, which struck Young in the head. It’s unclear if Mathis intended to fire a shot or if he was perhaps startled by the falling television.

Nonetheless, Mathis fled on foot, leaving Young behind.

Authorities are searching for 16-year-old Aurie Mathis, who is wanted for felony murder. (Photo: Bibb County Sheriff’s Office)

When deputies arrived a short time later, Young was lying in the doorway of the home. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The homeowner, although shaken up over the ordeal, was physically unharmed.

Mathis, who is now wanted for felony murder, remains at large. He is described as 16 years old, 5-foot-6 and weighing around 140 pounds. Authorities say he should be considered armed and dangerous.

The investigation is ongoing. Anyone with information about the break-in or Mathis’ whereabouts is asked to contact the Bibb County Sheriff’s Office at 478-751-7500 or Macon Regional Crime Stoppers at 1-877-68CRIME.

According to reports, at the time he was killed, Young had been out of prison for less than a year after serving a four-year sentence for burglary. He had been arrested a total of 35 times in Bibb County, six times for burglary.

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Categories: Gun News

Riton USA introduces three new RT-S Mod 7 Riflescopes

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 09:20

Riton’s RT-S Mod 7 Riflescopes are available in three models boasting various magnifications. (Photo: Riton USA)

Riton USA announced the addition of a new line of RT-S Mod 7 Riflescopes, kicking the series off with a set of three scopes available in 1-5, 4-20 and 5-25 magnification.

The scopes are engineered to help hunters and shooters tag their targets with features that include locking push/pull turrets and integrated illumine on/parallax controls built into one cohesive unit. Every feature has been designed and tested to meet the expectations of the veteran-owned, USA-based company.

“Whether our customers are using the Mod-7 on an AR for tactical competitions or on a long range rifle for precise, accurate repeatable shots, we are sure this new line is a perfect fit,” said Brady Speth, CEO of Riton USA, said in a press release. “Plus, these riflescopes are 100 perfect fog proof, shock proof and waterproof and come with Riton’s lifetime warranty.”

The RT-S Mod 7 with 1-5 magnification retails for $999, while the 4-20 version comes in a $1,219. Rounding out the pricing is the 5-25  magnification model which features a price tag of $1,429.

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Michigan automatic knife repeal heads to Governor

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 09:20

Michigan currently bans knives “which can be opened by the flick of a button, pressure on a handle or other mechanical contrivance” (Photo: Benchmade)

A popular bipartisan Senate bill to scrap Michigan’s 1950s-era ban on “switchblades” cleared the House on Thursday and is headed to Gov. Rick Snyder.

The measure, SB 245, only picked up a single “nay” vote in each chamber of the Legislature and aims to repeal a law backers describe as dangerously antique.

“Michigan’s law on these types of knives is outdated and was written at a time when popular films portrayed spring-assisted knives as extremely dangerous weapons,” said the bill’s author state Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, in a statement. “These are spring-assisted knives, such as utility knives commonly carried by police officers and members of the National Guard.”

The language in Jones’ bill would strike the classification on knives that can be opened with a button, handle pressure or other “mechanical contrivance” which currently carry a misdemeanor punishment of up to 93 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $2,000.

The American Knife and Tool Institute, a trade organization for knife rights, says the current ban makes “law-abiding, well-intentioned Michiganders such as tradesmen, hunters, hikers, farmers, ranchers, and campers risk arrest simply by possessing an automatic knife.”

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Categories: Gun News

DeSantis releases Slim-Tuk for Glock 43 with laser/light

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 09:18

The Slim-Tuk features a tuck-able IWB design. (Photo: DeSantis)

Holster maker DeSantis launched the Slim-Tuk design opening the minimalistic inside the waistband design up to laser/light equipped Glock 43s.

The ambidextrous IWB is fashioned from Kydex, a rigid plastic that boasts retention with its precision molded form. The Slim-Tuk utilizes a tuck-able 360-degree C-Clip, affording the concealed carrier an array of mounting options on the belt line. The hardware can be reversed, allowing the rig to move from the right side to the left. The C-Clip boasts adjustable tension and a rugged 1.75-inch design.

Though the IWB holster claims 10 different manufacturers and a total of 46 pistol pairings, the baby Glock is the latest to slip into the lineup. As an added bonus, DeSantis has included a Streamlight TLR-6 equipped G43 version so that shooters with a mounted laser/light can achieve the same level of concealment with the holster.

The G43 Slim-Tuk version is available online from DeSantis with a price tag just under $40.

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Categories: Gun News

Bill filed to halt rifle reporting requirement for border state gun stores

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:08

Rifles line a shelf in the gun library at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms National Tracing Center in Martinsburg, West Virginia, December 15, 2015. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Senate Republicans the week filed legislation to stop the controversial requirement for gun dealers along the U.S.-Mexico border to report multiple rifle sales to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

Termed the Protecting the Second Amendment Act, the measure was introduced Wednesday by U.S. Sen. Luther Strange, R-Alabama, with Texas Republicans Ted Cruz and John Cornyn signed on as co-sponsors. It aims to repeal a 2011 rule that Federal Firearms License holders in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas report whenever, during a five-day period, the same buyer purchases two or more rifles.

“The Obama administration demonstrated time and again a disturbing willingness to bypass the separation of powers and disregard Congress as a Constitutional watchdog,” Strange said in a statement. “Had the restrictions faced by lawful gun dealers in border states been applied to Alabama, many sportsmen, myself included, would have a difficult time practicing our hobby, and exercising our Constitutional rights.”

The bill, filed as S.1397, would nullify the reporting practice that came after the controversial “Fast and Furious” gun-walking operation was exposed. The agency currently requires that multiple sales of certain rifles defined as semi-automatic rifles greater than .22 caliber capable of accepting a detachable magazine be reported if two or more are sold to the same individual during any five consecutive business days.

Gun industry trade groups opposed the extra data collection from the start, pointing out that in ATF inspections of more than 2,000 FFLs in Texas and Arizona in 2011, none were charged with violations.

Aimed at garnering intelligence to prevent gun trafficking into Mexico, the regulation was upheld by a federal court in 2014 after a group of FFL holders in New Mexico challenged the requirement, claiming that the ATF did not have the authority to require such reporting as the Gun Control Act of 1968 only required the tracking of multiple handgun sales.

The National Rifle Association welcomed Strange’s legislation, saying it would, “roll back the Obama administration’s de facto gun registration scheme.”

S.1397 has been referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

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Categories: Gun News

Remington unveils new Model 1911 R1 Ultralight Commander

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:06

The R1 Ultralight Commander carries on the 1911 tradition, but with a lightweight design. (Photo: Remington)

Remington announced a new take on an old American favorite, introducing the new Remington Model 1911 R1 Ultralight Commander.

Remington manufactured its first Model 1911 during World War I and, in 2012, launched the 1911 R1 model. The R1 Ultralight Commander continues the series, bringing a lightweight design to the famed 1911.

The pistol’s type III hard coat anodized aluminum frame reduces weight by 20-percent, brniging its overall measurements down to just 31-ounces. Though the gun touts a lightweight design, Remington says the pistol continues to offer the same quality performance 1911 shooters are accustomed to.

Chambered in the traditional .45 Auto, the semi-automatic handgun boasts a 4.25-inch stainless steel barrel and 8+1 magazine capacity. Remington’s newest addition also features an adjustable trigger, PVD finished slide and aggressively checkered laminate grip. Rounding out its attributes are adjustable rear sights paired with a fiber optic front sight.

The new 1911 by Remington is priced at $849.

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Houston home invasion caught on camera (VIDEO)

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:05

Video from a home security system was released this week and shows the moment a group of five suspects broke into a Houston home last month and terrorized the homeowner.

The homeowner, who wanted to remain anonymous, said he woke up from an afternoon nap to five people in his home.

The suspects tied up the homeowner and stepped on, kicked, and pistol whipped him in the head and even put scissors to his fingers while demanding money. The ordeal went on for 25 minutes and during that time, the homeowner thought he was going to die.

“They began to put a pillow over my head. They had a gun over my head… I made my peace,” said the homeowner, who survived but has since moved out of the home.

The suspects made off with jewelry, designer bags, guns, and other valuables.

Mike Knox, a Houston City Council member and gang expert, said the home was likely targeted and called the operation “sophisticated.”

[ ABC 13 ]

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Categories: Gun News

Retired cop busted with more than 200 pounds of pot

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 07:05

Edward Jasper Hansen was charged with felony possession of marijuana. (Photo: Tooele County Sheriff’s Office)

A retired detective from Decatur, Georgia, who formerly worked robberies and sex crimes, was busted with more than 200 pounds of pot during a routine traffic stop in Utah last month, according to recently unsealed court documents.

Edward Jasper Hansen, 67, was charged with felony marijuana possession, in addition to manufacturing or delivering drug paraphernalia, which is a misdemeanor.

Hansen, who retired from the Atlanta Police Department in 1994, was driving through Tooele, about 35 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, on May 23 when he was stopped for a window tint violation. The officer – noting Hansen’s trembling hands, profuse sweating, and heavy breathing – called in a K-9 unit after observing that Hansen appeared to be “more nervous than the general motoring public.”

The K-9 alerted his handler to something in the covered bed of Hansen’s truck. There, officers found numerous duffel bags and trash bags containing 222 vacuumed-sealed bags, each containing a pound of pot. They also found a large amount of cash.

According to the arresting officer, “The driver did state the money was not going to get back to him anyway so to list his Costa Rica address on the asset seizure notice form. The driver then stated, ‘It’s a game,’ and, ‘Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose. Today wasn’t my day.’ When I told him that was not a good game to play, he then alluded [sic] that due to life and kids that ‘sometimes it’s worth the risk.’”

Lt. Jared Garcia with the Georgia Bureau of Investigations said such attitudes are common in the drug trafficking trade, noting that the risk of loss is relatively low compared to the large profits they stand to gain.

[ Deseret News ]

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Man busted with zombie kit including suppressed Hi-Point (VIDEO)

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:55

“Transit Policing Division deputies may have saved the lives of many people today when they arrested a man for urinating in public”– actual statement from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

According to the above press conference at the Hall of Justice and the accompanying release, Christopher Harrison Goodine, 28, of Union City, Georgia, was arrested Wednesday for a slew of charges including possession of a silencer (illegal in California except for law enforcement and licenced dealers), as well as possession of an “assault weapon” and of a “high-capacity magazine.”

Deputies apparently saw Goodine taking a leak at the Sierra Madre Gold Line Station, a light rail public transportation hub, and when they contacted him he refused to speak to the officers. This interaction led to an arrest after they found what officials describe as a “cache” of weapons in his duffle bag. These included a loaded AR-15 with a pair of 30-round mags, the first frowned upon without being featureless and the latter verboten in California after this year even if pre-ban.

There was also a really sweet $29 zombie killer/ninja mega knife katana (that’s how they are advertised), and– hold your breath this is the best part– a Hi-Point .40S&W that somehow had an ersatz suppressor device attached similar to those seen in the Walking Dead.

Police also found a rope and “a notebook with unidentified writing inside.”

As noted by the good folks over at The Firearm Blog, it’s farfetched that the Hi-Point flashlight suppressor would work for more than one shot in the likely absence of a recoil booster (Niesen Device), but hey, we can dream can’t we?

Goodline was booked at East Los Angeles Sheriff’s Station and is being held in lieu of $50,500 bail.

KTLA reports Goodine was previously arrested in 2015 in Key West, Florida and again at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel “wearing a bullet-proof vest, an empty gun holster, and a ski mask.”

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Kirsten Joy Weiss gets personal in NRA interview (VIDEO)

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:52

Pro shooter Kirsten Joy Weiss was recently interviewed by NRA All Access and shared a bit about the mission behind her YouTube channel, how she got her start as a professional sharp shooter, and some obstacles she had to overcome along the way. Weiss, a self-declared supporter of guns and freedom, also shared how the trick shots she’s so famous for came to be.

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Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:00

Winchester PDX1 Buck and Ball load, dissected. Three 0000, .380 diameter, buck pellets, a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, wad, Teflon sleeve and a three inch Fiocci hull. The Teflon wrapper was incorporated to reduce friction between the payload and the bore. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

In the days when smoothbore flintlock muskets were the weapons of choice for armies worldwide, one of the tricks used by soldiers to increase the effectiveness of their less than accurate weapons was to add a few pellets of buckshot to the usual payload of a large diameter lead roundball. Known as a “Buck and Ball” load, the idea behind the configuration was to combine the decisive impact of a big, heavy lead ball with the potential for hits on multiple targets afforded by the buckshot. Such a load was reported to have been particularly effective in combat situations where tightly packed rows of troops were firing on each other at close ranges. In the Americas, buck and ball musket loads were used in conflicts as late as the Civil War.

The concept of a buck and ball load may be an old one but it is not forgotten. Two fairly well-known products that contain such payloads are Multi-Defense Buckshot offered by the Italian ammo maker Centurion and the 12 gauge PDX1 rounds offered by Winchester.

The payload of the Centurion shells consist of a .650 inch diameter roundball placed atop six #1 (.30 inch diameter) buckshot pellets inside a 2.75 inch hull. The advertised muzzle velocity is 1300 f/s.  The 2.75 inch 12 PDX1 rounds pack a payload consisting of three 00 buckshot pellets seated over a one ounce rifled slug, all of  which leave the muzzle at an advertised velocity of 1150 f/s.

I was curious to see how such loads would group and pattern at ranges of 15 feet and 25 yards, so I obtained a box of both the Centurion and the Winchester buck and ball offerings.  Additionally, I was unable to resist the urge to make my own 12 gauge buck and ball handload. Feeling a perhaps unhealthy need to outdo the manufacturers in terms of payload mass and projectile diameter, my homemade buck and ball rounds consisted of three 0000 (.380 diameter) buck pellets atop a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, all inside a three inch Fiocci hull. The powder charge consisted of 35 grains of Alliant Blue Dot and the payload was buffered and wrapped in a Teflon sleeve. Total payload mass was just under 1.875 ounce.

Since this load is essentially my own invention, anyone attempting to duplicate it does so at their own risk. It worked well in my Benelli Nova, but the results may vary. Since I do not chronograph shotshell loads, the velocity of the handload is unknown.

Each load was tested by first firing three rounds at a 14 inch by 11 inch target at a range of 15 feet, which I consider to be an “across the room” distance. The loads were then tested at a range of 25 yards by firing three rounds of each at a 22 inch by 14 inch target. All loads were fired through my pump action Benelli Nova with an 18 inch barrel and fixed improved cylinder choke.

Centurion 2.75 inch Multi Defense Buckshot

At 15 feet, the roundball portion of the payload clustered into a cloverleaf group at the very center of the 14 inch by 11 inch target. It was hard to tell exactly how many buckshot hit the target as some holes made by the pellets could have easily been obscured by the holes made by the roundballs and wad components. The maximum diameter of the pattern was eight inches.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 foot test of the Centurion load. The contents of all three rounds clustered fairly tightly near the center of the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At 25 yards, the roundballs strung along a six inch diagonal line near the center of the target. I could verify that 12 of the 21 buckshot hit the target. Some of the holes made by the buckshot may have been obscured by the holes punched by the roundballs while the rest likely did not hit the paper. Of all loads tested during the range session, the Centurions recoiled the least.

At 25 yards, the pattern opened up significantly. Some of the buckshot missed the target entirely. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Winchester, 2.75 inch PDX1 12 gauge

At 15 feet, the three slugs tore a ragged hole through the targets bullseye and I was able to verify that all nine buckshot stayed on target. At its widest point, the pattern measured eight inches diameter.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 yard, three shot group of Winchester PDX1 ammo. The slugs tore a ragged hole and all buckshot hit the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At a distance of 25 yards, the slugs grouped into three inches just above the bullseye, but only three buckshot wound up on the paper. Recoil was on par with most other one ounce 12 gauge slug loads I’ve fired.

At 25 yards the slugs from the PDX1 rounds printed a reasonably tight group. Only three of 21 buckshot pellets struck the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Handloaded .718 inch diameter roundball plus three 0000 buckshot

The three shot group/pattern yielded by my handload at 15 feet put all roundballs within 1.5 inches of each other and all nine buckshot on the target for a total spread that was seven inches at its widest point. Upon extending the distance to 25 yards however, the pattern opened up significantly. The roundballs grouped into a triangular pattern that was four inches on each side and only three buckshot hit the paper.

The target above shows the group and pattern printed by the author’s buck and ball handload. The roundballs clustered close together and all the buckshot stayed inside a seven inch circle. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

While I did not test any of the above loads for terminal performance, it stands to reason that all three loads would create a devastating wound in a home invader at the distances commonly found within the average home. Admittedly, at such close ranges a standard slug or buckshot load will also create a devastating wound. Additionally, I’m not convinced that at close ranges, the 12 gauge buck and ball loads increase the likelihood of a hit when compared to standard buckshot loads.

At 25 yards, the roundballs in the author’s handloads grouped acceptably close together. Only three buckshot pellets struck the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At longer ranges, the roundballs are still accurate enough to stay within a torso-sized target, but a bulk of the buckshot fly wide of the target, resulting in unaccounted for projectiles. Additionally, heavy slugs and roundballs may create an overpenetration hazard in some situations.

While it may be debatable as to whether or not modern buck and ball loads offer a practical advantage over standard slug and buckshot loads, they may be just the right ammo to grab in the event that a column of angry redcoats gathers on your lawn.

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Categories: Gun News

Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:00

Winchester PDX1 Buck and Ball load, dissected. Three 0000, .380 diameter, buck pellets, a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, wad, Teflon sleeve and a three inch Fiocci hull. The Teflon wrapper was incorporated to reduce friction between the payload and the bore. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

In the days when smoothbore flintlock muskets were the weapons of choice for armies worldwide, one of the tricks used by soldiers to increase the effectiveness of their less than accurate weapons was to add a few pellets of buckshot to the usual payload of a large diameter lead roundball. Known as a “Buck and Ball” load, the idea behind the configuration was to combine the decisive impact of a big, heavy lead ball with the potential for hits on multiple targets afforded by the buckshot. Such a load was reported to have been particularly effective in combat situations where tightly packed rows of troops were firing on each other at close ranges. In the Americas, buck and ball musket loads were used in conflicts as late as the Civil War.

The concept of a buck and ball load may be an old one but it is not forgotten. Two fairly well-known products that contain such payloads are Multi-Defense Buckshot offered by the Italian ammo maker Centurion and the 12 gauge PDX1 rounds offered by Winchester.

The payload of the Centurion shells consist of a .650 inch diameter roundball placed atop six #1 (.30 inch diameter) buckshot pellets inside a 2.75 inch hull. The advertised muzzle velocity is 1300 f/s.  The 2.75 inch 12 PDX1 rounds pack a payload consisting of three 00 buckshot pellets seated over a one ounce rifled slug, all of  which leave the muzzle at an advertised velocity of 1150 f/s.

I was curious to see how such loads would group and pattern at ranges of 15 feet and 25 yards, so I obtained a box of both the Centurion and the Winchester buck and ball offerings.  Additionally, I was unable to resist the urge to make my own 12 gauge buck and ball handload. Feeling a perhaps unhealthy need to outdo the manufacturers in terms of payload mass and projectile diameter, my homemade buck and ball rounds consisted of three 0000 (.380 diameter) buck pellets atop a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, all inside a three inch Fiocci hull. The powder charge consisted of 35 grains of Alliant Blue Dot and the payload was buffered and wrapped in a Teflon sleeve. Total payload mass was just under 1.875 ounce.

Since this load is essentially my own invention, anyone attempting to duplicate it does so at their own risk. It worked well in my Benelli Nova, but the results may vary. Since I do not chronograph shotshell loads, the velocity of the handload is unknown.

Each load was tested by first firing three rounds at a 14 inch by 11 inch target at a range of 15 feet, which I consider to be an “across the room” distance. The loads were then tested at a range of 25 yards by firing three rounds of each at a 22 inch by 14 inch target. All loads were fired through my pump action Benelli Nova with an 18 inch barrel and fixed improved cylinder choke.

Centurion 2.75 inch Multi Defense Buckshot

At 15 feet, the roundball portion of the payload clustered into a cloverleaf group at the very center of the 14 inch by 11 inch target. It was hard to tell exactly how many buckshot hit the target as some holes made by the pellets could have easily been obscured by the holes made by the roundballs and wad components. The maximum diameter of the pattern was eight inches.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 foot test of the Centurion load. The contents of all three rounds clustered fairly tightly near the center of the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At 25 yards, the roundballs strung along a six inch diagonal line near the center of the target. I could verify that 12 of the 21 buckshot hit the target. Some of the holes made by the buckshot may have been obscured by the holes punched by the roundballs while the rest likely did not hit the paper. Of all loads tested during the range session, the Centurions recoiled the least.

At 25 yards, the pattern opened up significantly. Some of the buckshot missed the target entirely. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Winchester, 2.75 inch PDX1 12 gauge

At 15 feet, the three slugs tore a ragged hole through the targets bullseye and I was able to verify that all nine buckshot stayed on target. At its widest point, the pattern measured eight inches diameter.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 yard, three shot group of Winchester PDX1 ammo. The slugs tore a ragged hole and all buckshot hit the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At a distance of 25 yards, the slugs grouped into three inches just above the bullseye, but only three buckshot wound up on the paper. Recoil was on par with most other one ounce 12 gauge slug loads I’ve fired.

At 25 yards the slugs from the PDX1 rounds printed a reasonably tight group. Only three of 21 buckshot pellets struck the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Handloaded .718 inch diameter roundball plus three 0000 buckshot

The three shot group/pattern yielded by my handload at 15 feet put all roundballs within 1.5 inches of each other and all nine buckshot on the target for a total spread that was seven inches at its widest point. Upon extending the distance to 25 yards however, the pattern opened up significantly. The roundballs grouped into a triangular pattern that was four inches on each side and only three buckshot hit the paper.

The target above shows the group and pattern printed by the author’s buck and ball handload. The roundballs clustered close together and all the buckshot stayed inside a seven inch circle. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

While I did not test any of the above loads for terminal performance, it stands to reason that all three loads would create a devastating wound in a home invader at the distances commonly found within the average home. Admittedly, at such close ranges a standard slug or buckshot load will also create a devastating wound. Additionally, I’m not convinced that at close ranges, the 12 gauge buck and ball loads increase the likelihood of a hit when compared to standard buckshot loads.

At 25 yards, the roundballs in the author’s handloads grouped acceptably close together. Only three buckshot pellets struck the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At longer ranges, the roundballs are still accurate enough to stay within a torso-sized target, but a bulk of the buckshot fly wide of the target, resulting in unaccounted for projectiles. Additionally, heavy slugs and roundballs may create an overpenetration hazard in some situations.

While it may be debatable as to whether or not modern buck and ball loads offer a practical advantage over standard slug and buckshot loads, they may be just the right ammo to grab in the event that a column of angry redcoats gathers on your lawn.

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Categories: Gun News

Canadian sniper smashes world record with 2 mile kill shot in Iraq

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 23:05

A Canadian sniper fires his weapon at the Batoche Small Arms Range in September 2013. (Photo: Cpl Claude Arseneault/Canadian Army)

Military officials confirmed Thursday that a sniper with Canada’s strategic-level counter-terrorism forces smashed the record for longest confirmed kill shot in military history with a distance of 3,540 meters.

A member of the secretive Joint Task Force 2 fired the deadly round from a McMillan TAC-50, killing an ISIS fighter in Iraq from more than 2 miles away. The kill shot crushes the previous record, which was 2,475 meters, according to Toronto’s Globe and Mail.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” a military source told the paper. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

The sniper fired the world record round from a high rise during an operation sometime in the last month. The bullet took less than 10 seconds to strike the insurgent. Officials say the kill was verified with video footage.

“Hard data on this. It isn’t an opinion. It isn’t an approximation. There is a second location with eyes on with all the right equipment to capture exactly what the shot was,” an official said.

The two man sniper team had to account for distance, wind, and the curvature of the earth. The kill required not only precise ammunition and weaponry, but good eyes and some math — not to mention training.

“Canada has a world-class sniper system. It is not just a sniper. They work in pairs. There is an observer,” a military source told the Globe and Mail. “This is a skill set that only a very few people have.”

Canadian Armed Forces officials wouldn’t provide details on when or how the kill took place. JTF2 operations are classified and the government doesn’t often comment about what they’re up to. Canadian forces in Iraq serve an “advise and assist” function, and a maximum number of 830 members are approved to take part in operations.

British sniper Craig Harrison held the previous record using a .338 Lapua Magnum rifle to kill a Talban gunner in 2009.

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Ruling granting access to dash cam video in Pennsylvania may not last long

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 15:45

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled 5-2 in favor of allowing police dash cam video from car accidents to be released to the public, but the ruling may not last very long.

The ruling stems from a March 2014 right-to-know request from Michelle Grove. She wanted dash cam video from an accident her friend was involved in, but state police denied the request, citing a criminal investigative records exemption, according to the ruling.

Grove didn’t give up. A couple months later, she appealed that denial to the state’s open records office. The office granted her request, but then state police appealed the decision in court. Tuesday’s ruling upheld the decision to grant Grove access to the videos, making dash cam videos public records unless police can prove a specific exemption.

“Citizens should care because it gives them the ability to access police dash camera video, which will help them understand police interaction in the community and provide accountability,” said Melissa Melewsky, who filed a friend of the court brief in the case on behalf of a newspaper trade group in Pennsylvania.

While narrow in the scope of release, the decision opens up the state’s tightly held police videos. But the ruling may soon be moot, as the state legislature is taking up a bill that would exempt dash cam and body cam videos from right-to-know requests.

Senate Bill 560 would give police departments discretion in which requests to honor or refuse. The bill has passed both chambers, and state Sen. Stewart Greenleaf said he expects the bill to head to the governor by the end of the week. Gov. Tom Wolf has said he supports the measure.

“There are significant public access problems with Senate Bill 560,” said Melewsky.

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