Gun News

Daniel Defense’s DDM4V11 Pro Reviewed

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 08/22/2019 - 06:57

The DDM4V11 PRO is a competition ready, high quality ar-15. This rifle is loaded to the gills with high end parts and features that will result in faster split times and higher scores.

The post Daniel Defense’s DDM4V11 Pro Reviewed appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

The Humble yet Increasingly Collectible SKS Rifle: A History

General Gun News - Thu, 08/22/2019 - 05:30

With its origin in WWII and Cold War production history, the SKS can be a thing of beauty. (Photo: Guns.com)

SEE SKS RIFLES NOW FOR SALE AT GUNS.COM!

A common question posed is, “Who made the SKS?” The answer to that question is curious and contains some unexpected twists and turns. When it comes to Soviet small arms used in World War II, the quick and common answers are typically 7.62x54R-caliber rifles like the iconic Mosin-Nagant M91/30 and SVT-40, alongside the ever-present PPSh-41 and PPS-43 submachine guns chambered in pistol-caliber 7.62x25mm. This is understandable as wartime figures say that the Motherland was able to pony up a staggering 18 million of those weapons alone during the conflict. However other arguably man-portable weapons also appeared in the hands of Stalin’s “frontoviks” to include the PTRS-41 anti-tank gun.

This thing. (Photo: Vitaly V. Kuzmin/Wiki Commons)

The outsized elephant gun sprang from the mind of one Sergei Simonov and the rifle’s designation, in typical Russian fashion, includes his name (Protivo Tankovoye Ruzh’yo Simonova= Simonov’s Anti-Tank Gun) in its title. The downright chunky five-shot semi-automatic was chambered in 14.5x114mm — a round a good bit larger than John Browning’s vaunted .50-caliber BMG. Weighing in at 46-pounds, the PTRS-41 was used to snipe at German tanks and vehicles on the Eastern Front during WWII and has been kept in low-key service around the globe ever since then for use as an anti-material rifle, predating the invention of the Barrett M82 by nearly 50 years.

Why all this talk of anti-tank guns? Well, when the Soviet military moved to adopt the 7.62x39mm M43 round in 1943 and sought carbine designs to use the forward-thinking new intermediate cartridge, Simonov stepped forward with what was essentially a down-sized PTRS-41 chambered for the new flavor. The resulting 8.5-pound semi-automatic carbine he submitted used a wood stock, like the previous Mosin and SVT-series rifles, but was fed via a top-loaded 10-round magazine that could be topped off rapidly using stripper clips.

Trialed in combat in 1944 by Ivans who no doubt were unaware they were beta-testers, the handy carbine, with its reliable gas piston action, was a success and it was adopted in 1945 becoming known as the Samozaryadnyi Karabin Simonova or Self-loading Carbine Simonov: the SKS-45.

A Soviet-made SKS-45 series rifle up for grabs in the Guns.com Vault with its standard folding short knife-style bayonet and distinctive dark wood stock. (Photo: Guns.com)

Put into production while the AK47 was simultaneously being developed and fielded, Soviet SKS rifles were only made for about six years, from 1949 to 1955, at the Tula and Izhevsk factories in what is now Russia. As the AK was more compact, select-fire, and ultimately easier to produce, the SKS soon fell out of favor with Moscow and its line was cut short.

This resulted in the guns and the know-how to manufacture them soon being exported to fellow Communist countries such as Red China, where they were put into production in 1956 as the Type 56 rifle. Rumania soon followed where the SKS became the M56. Yugoslavia got on Team Simonov where it became known as the M59. East Germany, in keeping with their Teutonic traditions, termed their locally made SKSs as the Karabiner-S. Other countries to make the gun, who later got the secret recipe from China, included North Korea and Albania.

A Chinese Norinco SKS available in the Guns.com Vault, sans bayonet which was often removed during the 1994 to 2004 federal “assault weapon” ban to make them compliant. Note the “orange” wood stock. (Photo: Guns.com)

These Chinese-made 12.5-inch spike-style bayonets were often removed from the rifles and sold during the ban as curios, with the caveat that they could not be re-installed on SKS’s as they would instantly become assault-y. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

A Yugoslav-made Zastava-produced M59/66 SKS clone up for grabs in the Guns.com Vault. These guns are easily identified by their buttplate, Russian-style bayonet, and distinctive muzzle device and corresponding ladder sight made for launching rifle grenades. Later versions of this rifle included a flip-up forward night sight as well. (Photo: Guns.com)

Coming to America

Like the AK47, the SKS remained something of a mystery in the West for an extended period. The CIA reported on the gun’s existence in 1955 while the first real-live versions were only captured in 1956 by French troops during the Suez Crisis operating in Egypt.

The CIA’s first impression of the SKS, in 1955. (Photo: CIA)

By the Vietnam conflict in the 1960s, the SKS became increasingly familiar to U.S. troops who often encountered the then-second-tier infantry rifle in large numbers, given by Moscow and Beijing to North Vietnam freely as military aid.

Left: “A Viet Cong soldier crouches in a bunker with an SKS rifle, 1968.” Photographed by SPC4 Dennis J. Kurpuis. U.S. Army. Photograph in the National Archives. Right: “Captain Edward F. Riley, 9th Marine Regiment, examines one of over 600 North Vietnamese Army SKS rifles captured by men of his company during Operation Dewey Canyon, 1969.” USMC Photo.

Due to their semi-auto nature, GI-captured SKS rifles from Southeast Asia became a popular war trophy for returning American Vietnam Vets returning home and were the first such rifles to come into the U.S. By the early 1980s, Chinese-made examples produced for the commercial market began to be imported to the U.S. through companies like Navy Arms, Century, K-Sports, Poly Tech, KBI and B-West. This trickle turned into a flood and the days of the “$99” SKS were born about the same time that New Coke and MTV hit the scene. At the time Simonov, who lived until 1986, likely found that curious.

This golden era of the SKS ended when Chinese rifle exports were halted, only to be replaced by a silver era that followed the Cold War in which Russian and Yugo-made guns were brought in by the crate.

The easy availability of these guns led to several wholly Red, White and Blue modifications to the SKS which included aftermarket SVD-style stocks, often cranky extended magazines, and other enhancements. It could be argued that the SKS and its availability at every gun show, pawnshop, and LGS in the 1980s and 90s gave rise to companies like TAPCO.

A TAPCO display at SHOT Show– still offering aftermarket SKS furniture today. (Chris Eger/Guns.com)

This SKS in the Guns.com Vault came to us with a bullpup stock kit from SG Works, bipod and extended mag. (Photo: Guns.com)

Sadly, the vast boatloads of surplus SKS rifles headed to the U.S. have slowed to a trickle, which has combined with SKSs of both Russian and Chinese origin now being forbidden from import, to turn the once common 7.62x39mm semi-auto into more of a collectible than a hard-serving camp rifle or “truck gun.”

These days, if you can grab one for a good price, it’s likely to be a worth wild investment as the days of the $99 SKS are likely never to return.

SEE SKS RIFLES NOW FOR SALE AT GUNS.COM!

The post The Humble yet Increasingly Collectible SKS Rifle: A History appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

KelTec Testing Waters on .45 ACP, 10mm Sub2000

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 08/22/2019 - 05:20

Keltec, the company that makes the Sub2000 pistol-caliber carbine, recently asked customers what they'd like to see in a .45 ACP or 10mm Auto model.

The post KelTec Testing Waters on .45 ACP, 10mm Sub2000 appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Winchester adds new 20 Gauge Models to Super X4 Line

General Gun News - Thu, 08/22/2019 - 05:00

Winchester’s Super X4 20-gauge models weigh in at approximately 6.25 to 6.75-pounds, depending on the model. (Photo: Winchester)

SEE WINCHESTER SUPER X4s AT GUNS.COM FROM $768

Winchester Repeating Arms this week announced they have several new models of their gas-operated Super X4 semi-auto shotguns available in 20 gauge.

The seven new models, in a broad range of composite, compact and wood-stocked configurations, bring what Winchester describes as a lighter, trimmer and quicker installment to complement their existing 12-gauge Super X4 line. The new 20s are billed as more appealing to smaller shooters, those sensitive to recoil or those seeking a lighter gun in the field.

When comparing specs, the 20-gauge variants typically run about a quarter-pound lighter than their 12-gauge big brothers in the same model and with the same barrel length.

All Super X4s use Winchester’s Active Valve Gas System for low felt recoil and record-setting cycling speed. The shotguns feature an oversize bolt handle and bolt release button which are ideal for sportsmen in the field with gloves.

Unique to the 20-gauge versions is the Speed Loading feature unique, which sends the first shell loaded into the magazine directly to the chamber when the bolt is open.

The 20 gauge models available are comprehensive, with models in both the Super X4 and Super X4 Compact series sporting 24-, 26- or 28-inch barrels; a Waterfowl Hunter and a Field series with either a 26- or 28-inch barrel; and a Waterfowl Hunter Compact with a 24- or 26-inch barrel. In the gun’s Universal Hunter and Field Compact series, 20-gauge versions are hitting the market with 24-, 26- and 28-inch barrel options.

MSRP is between $939 and $1,069 depending on model.

SEE WINCHESTER SUPER X4s AT GUNS.COM FROM $768

Guns.com’s own Kristin Alberts extensively reviewed the SX4 system as a whole in 2017.

The post Winchester adds new 20 Gauge Models to Super X4 Line appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

All About AKs with Lee Armory’s Mario Parada

General Gun News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 23:30

Lee Armory’s Mario Parada has been immersed in AK culture since he was a teen. (Photo: Jacki Billings)

Mario Parada was introduced to the AK-47 platform as a youngster, building the Societ rifles with his uncle in a garage as a teen. His love for the rifle didn’t stop at passion projects, though. Parada has since turned his affection for AKs into a full-fledged career churning out AKs as the Shop Lead for Lee Armory.

Guns.com first met Parada while visiting Lee Armory, immediately struck by his effortless expertise and knowledge of the AK platform. After leaving Lee Armory, there were some lingering questions we had for the AK aficionado, so we phoned Arizona and pumped Parada for more AK answers.

Guns.com:I feel like before we get too far we should address the rivalry between the AR-15 and AK-47 in American gun culture. Give me some thoughts on this. Will the AK ever reach the heights of the AR-15 in America?

Parada: The AR-15 will always be America’s rifle. The AK will never replace the AR as far as being America’s rifle, but the AK has its part in the gun world and in U.S. gun culture.

I think the AK-47 is a rifle that a lot of people misunderstand and it’s also been misrepresented. Ya know, in history it’s always been used by the bad guys. When it was invented, it was invented by Mikhail Kalashnikov for his people. In my opinion, it was very patriotic of him to say, “I want to give my soldiers a rifle that would give them a competitive edge.” So, it’s not a bad guy gun — there’s a place for it here.

Parada demonstrates the internals of the AK. (Photo: Jacki Billings)

Guns.com: Right on. It definitely operates a little differently than the AR which, I think, can sometimes intimidate people. What’s an area you see people struggle with that really sets the AK apart from its American counterpart?

Parada: There are some key differences in them but the biggest is the AR-15 controls. The controls on the AR are very easy. The AK, I believe, takes a little more training to understand; but once you understand it, you can take what you’ve learned and apply that knowledge to any rifle.

Guns.com: Kind of like once you learn to drive a manual, you can pretty much drive anything. Which kind of leads me into my next question. Do you think that more people are putting in the time to get to know the AK and therefore it’s getting more respect as of late?

Parada: The interest has been increasing. We definitely have seen the numbers rise. Even though the AK has been around since 1947, it’s something different. You know, the AR is kind of getting old for people. I’m getting a lot of people in the shop who are already on their tenth AR build and that want something different. They’re getting bored with the AR-15 and they want to see what a Kalashnikov is all about.

Guns.com: Lee Armory kind of leads the flock to water in that respect, right? You guys take imported parts and kits and build them into fully operational and snazzy-looking AK-47s, ready to go for customers. Is there an advantage to this process of buying a fully built AK from Lee Armory versus DIYing it from random parts?

Parada: Well, the most obvious answer, even though it sounds cliche, is that buying from Lee Armory means you are supporting an American business. We are building from imported parts. Our main bread and butter are kits that come in from Romania but we’re doing all the final fitting, putting them on American receivers here in-house. We’re using all the required American parts to make them 922(r) compliant. Above all, this is being done by American hands. Everything is being hand-fitted.

We aren’t a huge company overseas just slapping these things together and putting them in crates. We literally hand press every rivet, we drill all the holes, we do all of that here. We are a small, family-owned business and we care about our products. A lot of pride goes into that. They may not be 100-percent American made as far as parts but they are 100-percent American made as far as labor.

Guns.com: Well, I definitely got to see, first hand, that love and attention to detail that you guys have for the AK while I was there building my own. So you mentioned Romanian parts and while I was taking the AK build class with you guys, Josh mentioned that country of origin plays a role in AK parts. So can you expand on that idea? Why does the country of origin matter?

The AK-47 offers different controls than the AR, but Parada says once owners master that they can operate just about any rifle. (Photo: Jacki Billings)

Parada: I wouldn’t say it makes a huge difference as far as the performance of the rifle but it makes a huge difference for the actual builder. You know, the rifle will just go together as smooth as butter and that’s important. The Polish kits from like the 1960s, those are just really nice. If you get a Russian kit from the same date those are really nice, too.

Guns.com: What’s your best advice for someone ready to dive in and buy an AK?

Parada: My biggest advice is to get educated on what you’re buying and don’t base your decision just on price point. I understand that price has a lot do with it as far as your budget, but there’s a saying in Spanish that anything cheap is always more expensive in the long run and that’s what I tell people when they come in here. You can buy cheap but this is going to break or that’s going to break and you will have to fix those things and it will be more expensive. So get educated on what you want and don’t buy just on price point.

Guns.com: Any other parting words or pearls of wisdom you want to leave the Guns.com readers with in regards to AKs?

Parada: Get out there. Go shoot the AK. Get yourself the experience first. Go to the local gun range and rent one for $10 and get the feel for it. Understand what you’re getting into. It’s a different culture. Also, take the advice of the people you are actually getting out there and shooting these and building these — people that are really doing this.

Parada tears up desert targets with a full-auto AK. (Photo: Jacki Billings)

The post All About AKs with Lee Armory’s Mario Parada appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

MDT ACC Chassis Stock: The Ultimate Long Range Build

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 17:38

MDT has recently introduced a very modular chassis for long-range precision target shooting. It's not a budget chassis or the cheapest stock you can buy but I think it may be one of the best and most adjustable chassis on the market.

The post MDT ACC Chassis Stock: The Ultimate Long Range Build appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Colt Debuts Full-Size King Cobra Target .357 Magnum

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 16:07

After a long, and for some absolutely excruciatingly painful wait, Colt is now offering a full-size King Cobra revolver chambered for .357 Magnum.

The post Colt Debuts Full-Size King Cobra Target .357 Magnum appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

David Hogg Calls for a Gun Czar, Buy Back, Government Youth Organization to Combat Gun Violence

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 13:51

In the never-ending fight among activists for the role as the nation’s leading anti-gun extremist, David Hogg just became king of the gun ban hill. The Parkland survivor and media hound released this week a draconian gun control plan -- dubbed "A Peace Plan for a Safer America" -- that makes the 1994 “assault weapons” ban look like the Second Amendment.

The post David Hogg Calls for a Gun Czar, Buy Back, Government Youth Organization to Combat Gun Violence appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Bear Edge Introduces a New 3 ¾” Stainless Steel Framelock

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 13:07

Bear Edge Knives, a Bear & Son Cutlery brand, introduces the new Bear Edge 61128.

The post Bear Edge Introduces a New 3 ¾” Stainless Steel Framelock appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

'Progressive' Fantasies About Guns

NRA-ILA News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:54
The idea that Americans have a constitutional right to own and possess firearms appalls today’s progressives. They believe that if they could just rid the nation of guns, then armed robberies, gang violence, mass shootings, rape, violent crime and maybe even suicide would vanish and we could all live peacefully ever after.
Categories: Gun News

Birchwood-Casey Offers Targets for Every Shooter’s Needs

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:50

Birchwood-Casey wants to let recreational shooters and hunters know that now is the time to stock up on targets before the seasonal inventory rush.

The post Birchwood-Casey Offers Targets for Every Shooter’s Needs appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Guns are a significant part of American society. Taking them away won't help.

NRA-ILA News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:46
Gun control is not the answer; universal background checks will do nothing to stop these mass shootings. Joe Biden, when Vice-President admitted this and said so. In all the recent mass shootings, the killer purchased the weapon(s) legally with a background check. Likewise, so-called red flag laws would not have stopped these as well.
Categories: Gun News

The United States is not Like the Rest of the World on Gun Control

NRA-ILA News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:16
If you’re an American, how you think about guns is usually related to three factors: What part of our country you grew up in; what you learned from your parents, relatives and friends; and whether you served in the military. Whether you or your family may have also been a victim of violence can have “pro” or “con” effect on your view on guns, and it’s easy to understand either reaction.
Categories: Gun News

Mossberg Introduces Patriot Predator 6.5 PRC Bolt-Action Rifles

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:00

Joining the family of suppressor and optics-ready Patriot Predator bolt-action rifles is the newest cartridge to dominate long-range shooting, the 6.5 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge).

The post Mossberg Introduces Patriot Predator 6.5 PRC Bolt-Action Rifles appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

SIG SAUER Electro-Optics Now Shipping OSCAR8 Spotting Scope

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 10:04

SIG SAUER Electro-Optics is now shipping the OSCAR8™ HDX Variable Power Spotting Scope.

The post SIG SAUER Electro-Optics Now Shipping OSCAR8 Spotting Scope appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Democratic Fundraiser Features Fake Donald Trump Execution

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 08:36

A group of supporters attending a fundraiser for Democratic Illinois State Senator Martin Sandoval were caught on camera this week enacting a fake execution of President Donald Trump.

The post Democratic Fundraiser Features Fake Donald Trump Execution appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Colt Pens Love Letter to Revolver Fans with New King Cobra Target

General Gun News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 06:00

The stainless steel, 6-round capacity, double-action revolver is the latest model in the modern King Cobra series. (Photo: Colt)

Adding another “snake” to their recently rebooted revolver line, Colt Firearms on Tuesday unveiled their new King Cobra Target model in .357 magnum.

The new wheel gun, following on the heels of their Cobra, Night Cobra, King Cobra, and Cobra Carry revolvers, features a 4.25-inch barrel, adjustable rear sight, elevated fiber optic front sight, and custom Altamont wood medallion grips. With an overall length of 9.25-inches, the six-shot full-lug target revolver is pitched for use by competitive shooters and those who just like to hit the range.

“After releasing the King Cobra earlier this year we received a flood of requests for a 4-inch model with adjustable sights,” said Justin Baldini, Colt’s Director of Marketing. “Our customers are excited to bring their Colts to the range and the King Cobra Target is engineered for accurate and enjoyable shooting.”

The revolver uses an LL2 linear leaf mainspring and sports a fiber optic front and adjustable rear sight. It is capable of using either .38 Special or .357 Magnum loads. (Photo: Colt)

MSRP on the King Cobra Target is $999. The revolver is currently restricted from California, Massachusetts, and Maryland.

The post Colt Pens Love Letter to Revolver Fans with New King Cobra Target appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Mossberg adds 6.5 PRC, 350 Legend to Patriot Series rifles

General Gun News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 05:30

When it comes to their 6.5 PRC-chambered Patriot rifles, Mossberg uses a standard contour, free-floating 24-inch barrel with a 1:8 twist rate, straight-edge fluting and 5/8”- 24TPI muzzle threads. Shown here on an FDE model. (Photo: Mossberg)

SEE MOSSBERG PATRIOTS AT GUNS.COM FROM $318

Mossberg this week announced new Patriot series bolt-action rifles chambered for the increasingly popular 6.5 Precision Rifle Cartridge and .350 Legend.

When it comes to 6.5 PRC, two new rifles in the Patriot Predator line for those looking to extend their range. The spicy new round– described as the “big brother” to the 6.5 Creedmoor— was introduced by Hornady in 2018 to scratch a new itch for those wanting to push out beyond 1,000 yards and has seen numerous gun makers move to produce rifles to accommodate it.

Mossberg’s Patriot Predator 6.5 PRCs both sport a 24-inch fluted and threaded barrel that, when coupled with a synthetic stock, keeps the 44.25-inch rifles at about 7-pounds. Shipping standard with a Picatinny scope base/rail, they have a 4+1 round magazine capacity. The difference between the two models is in the finish, with one available with a matte blue barrel and FDE stock while the other option has a Patriot Brown Cerakote finish on the metal surfaces and a True Timber Strata pattern stock.

Mossberg’s Patriot Predator 6.5 PRC with a Patriot Brown Cerakote finished barrel and True Timber Strata pattern stock. (Photo: Mossberg)

MSRP is $441 for the more basic FDE model, while the Patriot/True Timber finished variant retails for $524.

All Patriot series rifles include such standard features as Mossberg’s LBA user-adjustable trigger with a 2- to 7-pound range of adjustment, a spiral-fluted bolt with a checkered bolt handle and sling swivel studs.

350 Legend Models

The standard contour 22-inch carbon steel barrel on all the new Mossberg Patriot series bolt-action rifles in .350 Legend is free-floating, features a 1:16 twist rate and matte blue finish, shown here on a standard Patriot Synthetic model. (Photo: Mossberg)

Deer hunters in “straight-wall-cartridge-compliant” deer-hunting states will now have the option of going Mossberg when it comes to the new .350 Legend chambering. Introduced last year by Winchester to capitalize on the trend that has seen new rounds such as the .450 Bushmaster grow in popularity in the past few years, the cartridge maker contends the Legend offers a flatter trajectory and better terminal performance over their competitors while remaining compliant in most states.

Mossberg’s recently announced Legend-chambered bolt-action rifles include a Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam in both a standard and scoped combo package and a Patriot Synthetic that is also offered in a scoped package. All use a 22-inch fluted matte blue finished barrel with black synthetic furniture.

The Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam models use a variable length-of-pull stock that varies from 12 to 13-inches for better use by small-statured shooters, while the Patriot Synthetic series guns have what Mossberg calls a “classic-style” non-adjustable stock. On the scoped packages, the optic is a 3×9-40mm

Pitched to youth, the Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam allows the user to add spacers to increase the LOP from 12 to 13 inches as they grow or simply to allow a smaller-stature user to customize their fit. An optional 3×9-40mm scope package is offered with Weaver-style bases. (Photo: Mossberg)

MSRP ranges from $396 to $435 depending on model and package.

SEE MOSSBERG PATRIOTS AT GUNS.COM FROM $318

The post Mossberg adds 6.5 PRC, 350 Legend to Patriot Series rifles appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Gun Review: Lee Armory AKM

General Gun News - Wed, 08/21/2019 - 05:00

With sanctions against Russia prohibiting the import of AK rifles and parts from the motherland, it’s been tough for American AK owners. But it’s also opened up opportunities for companies like Arizona-based Lee Armory to really shine. The Lee Armory AKM is as American as an AK can get.

Using Romanian parts kits, Lee Armory does everything in house making their rifles 922r compliant. Lee Armory rifles are equipped with a 16.5-inch cold hammer forged barrel, classic wooden furniture, and a polished Tapco enhanced trigger. They also ship with one 30-round X-Tech magazine.

While just about every AK found in the U.S. starts as parts shipped from another country, one way to tell that you have a good one is look at the rivets. The rivets are what mortar is to a brick house. They ensure the gun actually holds together and works properly!

With a Lee Armory AK, there’s no frills, bells or whistles. The rifle will test your shooting abilities and you’ll love it for that. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

Lee Armory hand presses Russian spec rivets into their receivers. On inspection, rivets on my Lee Armory AK were on point. They were tight and flush against the receiver and the holes they’re in weren’t elongated in any way.

On the range, I took the Lee Armory AK out to 350 yards and had some fun on some steel. Shooting Wolf steel-cased ammo, it was boringly reliable. The iron sighting system on AK is already somewhat limited by its short radius and miss aligned irons would only put me at further disadvantage. This AK on the other hand was an absolute pleasure to shoot with irons only.

Using Romanian parts kits, Lee Armory does everything in house making their rifles 922r compliant. Lee Armory rifles are equipped with a 16.5-inch cold hammer forged barrel, classic wooden furniture, and a polished Tapco enhanced trigger. They also ship with one 30-round X-Tech magazine. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

Functionally, the Lee Armory AK had a perfectly straight front sight post with a very fine rear aperture that had adjustments out to 1,000 meters. I cannot tell you how many times I have picked up an imported AK and looked down the sights only to see that the front post was crooked. That is an instant deal breaker for me.

The first rifle I ever bought was an AK-47, but I’ve since gotten away from the design. Needless to say, this rifle brought back a lot of memories. In general, AKs are simple firearms. There’s no frills, bells or whistles. Nothing to aid you in mitigating recoil or running the gun faster. It’s all focus and fundamentals. Lee Armory meets that standard. This is a rifle that will test your shooting abilities and you will love it for that.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $825

The post Gun Review: Lee Armory AKM appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

The Future of African Wildlife Hangs in the Balance

NRA-ILA News - Tue, 08/20/2019 - 11:49
This week, representatives of 180 nations are gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, for the 18th Conference of Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES.) Adopted in 1963, CITES globally governs the import and export of wildlife and wildlife products, including hunting trophies. The treaty is also the origin of implementing laws like the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).
Categories: Gun News

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