Gun News

Beretta Puts the X on the 92 Series

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 17:52

Beretta is expanding their time-tested 92 series with five new models that make up the new line of 92X guns all chambered for 9mm Luger.

The post Beretta Puts the X on the 92 Series appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

FN Unveils Optics-Ready Midsize FN 509

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 17:19

FN America announced today an optics-ready version of the popular Midsize 509 Tactical, featuring FN’s patented MRD optics mounting system that is compatible with over 10 commercially available miniature red dots.

The post FN Unveils Optics-Ready Midsize FN 509 appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Homeowner Shoots Suspected Intruder During Home Invasion

NRA-ILA News - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 14:39
Police said a suspected intruder was shot during a home invasion on the Southwest Side on Wednesday morning. The incident happened at a home along Five Palms Drive, near Old Pearsall Road.
Categories: Gun News

2020 Democratic Candidate: We Need to Stop Selling AR-15 Ammo

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 09:27

Marianne Williamson, a candidate vying for the Democratic nomination for president, spoke out about how to "combat the epidemic of gun violence in the U.S."

The post 2020 Democratic Candidate: We Need to Stop Selling AR-15 Ammo appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Hunting On The QT: The New CZ 527 American Synthetic Suppressor-Ready Rifle

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 08:23

For 2019, CS-USA adds the new CZ 527 American Synthetic Suppressor-Ready rifle to the 527 line of lighter-weight, agile centerfires.

The post Hunting On The QT: The New CZ 527 American Synthetic Suppressor-Ready Rifle appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

What to Look for When Buying a Used Rifle

General Gun News - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 07:00

In the end, while that new rifle smell may be tempting, don’t walk away from a good deal on a great used gun if you can get it. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

There are lots of reasons why a used rifle could be just the thing to scratch a gun-buying itch, provided you avoid some common pitfalls.

Identify your needs

Reasons for rifle shopping can range from collecting to hunting and sports shooting to personal protection. Some can check several boxes, for instance with a Ruger 10/22 rimfire doubling as a small game getter and weekend plinker. Or a modern sporting rifle like the Smith & Wesson M&P15 being used in both predator control and 3-Gun Shooting. Likewise, a vintage Winchester Model 94 cowboy gun or military classic bolt-action can be both an investment and, with care, still clock in for hunts or the occasional target practice when needed. With an idea about what boxes you want to check, proceed to…

Research your decision

Once you have identified a family or type of rifle you are shopping for, spend a while doing the legwork — or these days, the point-and-click work — to find out more information. Identify specifics about the firearm such as length, weight, and caliber to make sure to find the best fit for your needs. For instance, if looking for a varmint gun you plan on hiking up (and down) a mountain ridge with, and are conscious about every ounce, you may want to look into something like the Howa 1500 KUIU, which tips the scales at just 6.5-pounds.

However, if your planned use involves resting up and reaching out to some serious distance — a scenario where weight is not such a pressing matter but a heavy bull barrel is — look to something more akin to the 9.5-pound Browning X-Bolt Max Varmint Target. While both are bolt-action hunting rifles, they are very different in scope.

In this same vein, be sure to explore in-depth reviews of various models to get a vicarious “feel” for how the gun functions.

It’s all about the condition

While a new rifle fresh from the factory should be relatively flawless, many used rifles will have a condition that will vary considerably from “like new” to unsafe to fire. When coming across potential good buys “in the wild,” here are some great pointers on how to inspect wear and tear on a rifle:

On the upside of this, many gun owners will pick up a new firearm, often without doing the proper research, and discover it doesn’t suit their needs or for one reason or another. As a result, they very rarely if ever used it. These types of guns, often still in outstanding material condition, are an ideal choice for a good used rifle.

“Think about all the guns that you’ve owned that maybe you’ve only had the opportunity to go hunt with at one time or you bought it and you stuck it in the corner to the gun safe and never touched it again,”explained Mark Sims, Guns.com’s senior buyer. “And then those guns come back around, and you decide, ‘You know what? I’m interested in something else,’ or, ‘I didn’t enjoy that gun quite as much as I expected I would.’ And then you sell those guns. Well, we are buying those guns every day, all day.”

Look for a guarantee

One thing that sets Guns.com apart from the pack when it comes to used rifles is their Certified Used Guns program, which is often more affordable by as much as 20 to 30 percent than the same gun brand new. At the same time, they’re in great condition and backed up by an inspection done by professionals– as well as a no questions asked return policy.

“Just see what’s available, compare it to what you’ve been looking at on the new gun side, and then make your own informed decision,” said Sims.

In the end, while that new rifle smell may be tempting, don’t walk away from a good deal on a great used gun if you can get it. The money you save can always be dropped on ammo!

If you’re interested in buying a rifle, check out the collection inside the Guns.com Vault and Certified Used Guns

The post What to Look for When Buying a Used Rifle appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Grey Ghost Precision Debuts Sig P320 Slides at TriggrCon

General Gun News - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 05:00



TriggrCon offers a first look into some new and improved designs with Grey Ghost Precision using the venue to debut its new set of slides for the Sig Sauer P320. The slides share the same design qualities as GGP’s Glock aftermarket goodies, but now boast support for the Sig Sauer P320. The P320 slides are machined from 416 stainless steel and are available in Black and Grey Diamond Like Coating, or DLC, as well as Flat Dark Earth Cerakote.

The Sig P320 Slides from grey Ghost Precision offer multiple color options, like FDE. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The slides add a bit more flair to the Sig Sauer P320 platform, introducing an optics ready design that works alongside Leupold DPP, Trijicon RMR and Sig Romeo1 red dots. Screws and plates are included with the slide. For users who opt for traditional iron sights, the slide does include a G10 Cover Plate.

Version 1 of the GGP 320 slides feature tapered serrations and is compatible with Sig P320 Full-Size, Compact and Carry grip modules. The Full-Size version tips the scales at 8.8-ounces while the compact weighs in at 7.6-ounces.

The GGP Sig Sauer P320 Slides offer tapered serrations. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

With the prevalence of the Sig Sauer P320, thanks in part to the military’s decision to adopt it as the U.S. Army’s new sidearm, GGP said it was time for Sig Sauer users to enjoy some Grey Ghost Precision fun.

The slides are due out in August with prices set at $430 for the Full-Size version and $419 for the Compact.

GGP’s booth was full of interested onlookers catching a glimpse at the new slides. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The post Grey Ghost Precision Debuts Sig P320 Slides at TriggrCon appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

New York, San Diego Ratchet up Mandatory Gun Lock Laws

General Gun News - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 04:30

The Heckler & Koch P7 uses a what at the time was seen as an innovative “squeeze-cocker” safety lever on the front of the grip. Gun owner groups argue the latest mandatory “safety” pushes in San Diego and New York are anything but. (Photo: Richard Taylor/Guns.com)

Democrats on both sides of the country on Tuesday greenlit laws that require gun owners to lock up their firearms at home under threat of fines and jail time.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D, signed what his office described as “some of the strongest safe storage measures in the nation” by approving S.6360 this week. The measure, which had tanked in numerous prior legislative sessions while Republicans held sway in the state Senate, requires that guns stored in a household with those under 16 — even if the youth is only visiting — be stored securely.

Gun owners who fail to meet the requirements face a $1,000 fine and up to a year in prison followed by three years of probation.

Meanwhile, on the West Coast, the San Diego City Council gave final approval this week to a measure backed by anti-gun groups of all stripes that could hand firearm owners found in violation of the storage ordinance as much as six months behind bars and fines topping $1,000.

Introduced in June by City Attorney Mara Elliott, the proposal requires people who keep firearms in their home to store them in locked containers or disable them with a trigger lock.

Michael Schwartz, director for San Diego County Gun Owners, told Guns.com the new city ordinance is not only unenforceable and unconstitutional, but it invades someone’s privacy and choice in their own home.

“There’s nothing common sense about this unconstitutional law,” he said. “This law forces San Diego residents to have their firearms inoperable unless actually being touched by their owner. It requires gun owners to store guns at home in a locked container or disable them with a trigger lock when not in use. Whether or not there are kids present in the home, this law limits how someone can store their firearm and, as a result, makes them less safe because it removes choices on how they can defend their life and the lives of their loved ones.”

The veto-proof proposed ordinance will become law in San Diego 30 days after Mayor Kevin Faulconer signs it. In New York, the new requirements go into effect Sept. 28.

The post New York, San Diego Ratchet up Mandatory Gun Lock Laws appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Gearhead Works Shows Off New Products at TriggrCon 2019

General Gun News - Wed, 07/31/2019 - 04:00



During TriggrCon last week, Gearhead Works released the Gearhead Works One Pistol chambered in 300 Blackout. The bolt-action pistol is built on a blank Remington 700 receivers, then kitted out to offer a cool and customized look. The company said the receiver is fitted with a Gearhead Works patented ATF approved Tailhook Pistol Brace to offer a suppressor-ready firearm that can easily slip into a backpack.

The tricked out One Pistol is built on a Remington 700 receiver. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The One Pistol measures 19.25-inches folded and weighs just over five pounds. The base model comes cerakoted in a single color though customers have the option to upgrade to nearly any configuration or color for a truly custom experience. The pistol starts at $1,500.

The base model One Pistol doesn’t come with flashy accoutrements but it is chambered in .300 BLK. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

In addition to the One Pistol, the company also released its newest folding stock, the MP5K Folder. Made with the same materials as H&K, the folder was designed to work alongside Gearworks Mod 1 Tailhook Pistol Brace. The Mod 1 retails for $119.

Rounding out the latest gear, Gearhead Works unveiled their new pistol grip for the CZ Scorpion. The pistol grip boasts elevated features like a loop for 550 cord, storage compartment in the base and a more ergonomic design for better trigger control. No word yet on price.

Gearhead Works’ MP5K folder. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The Gearhead Works Pistol Grip is designed to be used alongside the CZ Scorpion. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The post Gearhead Works Shows Off New Products at TriggrCon 2019 appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Joe Biden Steps Up Gun Targeting Ahead of Debate

NRA-ILA News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 13:12
Joe Biden’s been in Washington D.C. for nearly 50 years and he’s finally got a plan. Too bad, it’s not much of one. Former Vice President Joe Biden released his Criminal Justice campaign platform just in time for the second Democratic presidential candidate debate to be held in Detroit. He’s up to his old tricks. Denunciate. Conflate. Obfuscate.
Categories: Gun News

Florida Alert! Attorney General Ashley Moody: Assault Weapons Ban Ballot Measure "MISLEADING"

NRA-ILA News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 10:09
In the petition filed Friday, July 26th, Attorney General Ashley Moody informed the Florida Supreme Court that the "Assault Weapons Ban" ballot language is "misleading" and is "clearly and conclusively defective."
Categories: Gun News

Gun Review: Stevens 555E Over/Under Shotgun

General Gun News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 07:00

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $516

The new Stevens 555E brings together the best of two worlds. First, it’s chambered in 16 gauge, an intermediate shell sometimes called a “gentleman’s gauge.” Second, it’s the newest edition to the budget friendly line of field guns from “Stevens by Savage.” Together, these attributes make the Stevens 555E a highly underrated over/under design for busting clays and upland game hunting.

Within the Stevens line, Savage Arms offers three over/under models: the 555, the 555 Compact, and the 555E. While the Stevens 555E has a higher listing price than the other two, it’s the more feature-rich design. The Stevens 555E features auto ejectors, an imperial walnut stock, laser-engraved filigree ornament, a tang safety, single-selective mechanical triggers, a lightweight aluminum receiver reinforced with steel, and the gun ships with a dandy hard case and five interchangeable choke tubes.

Stevens does not merely throw different gauges and barrels on a single 12-gauge frame; rather, the 555 scales the aluminum receivers to each gauge. While aluminum is not terribly strong in such an action, Savage reinforces the breech with a steel insert. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

On the field, the 555E is a fast handling gun — no doubt aided by its light weight. At 6.45 pounds, the 555E is light enough to carry afield all day, quick to mount, and builds confidence with its accuracy on target. However, the reduced weight also means there’s some recoil, but even with heavier game loads, things are not bad at all. The gun shoulders like one of much higher price and demolished clay targets at all degrees of range and speed with ease.

While the fit and finish is no $5,000 double, that was never the intent. Further, the overall aesthetics on the 555E is considerably better than other budget-conscious Turkish-built O/U’s. The looks overall tend much more to the classy than the gaudy, a misstep on many such doubles.

Our test Model 555E in 16-gauge wears 28 inch chrome lined barrels, and the gun comes up well, swings smoothly, and hits hard at the point of aim on both patterning board and target. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

I fired a healthy mix of factory ammunition, which also points to the rising interest in 16-gauge chamberings. The selection included Aguila Standard Velocity #7 and #8; Aguila High Velocity #7.5 and #8; Federal Game Load #7.5; Federal Premium Wing Shok Upland #6; and Federal Speed Shok Steel Waterfowl #4. The gun produced consistent, even patterns with all the ammunition and factory chokes tested.  With the variety of loads, it proved a more than capable gun for anything from relaxed target shooting to hardcore waterfowling.

While I’m not nearly as snobby about triggers on shotguns then I am rifles, it is worth noting that the single mechanical trigger on our test 555E is a step above what is usually accepted on such O/U’s.

Factory ammunition offerings are plenty, with multiple 16-gauge options including Federal, Federal Premium, and Aguila, in both lighter target loads and heavier hunting rounds. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

The Stevens by Savage makes a fine upland hunting gun and doubles as a classy clays companion as well. To get such a gun at a reasonable price point makes it that much more appealing. While there may be other slightly less costly foreign-manufacture doubles, be sure to study both the strength and design of the action as well as the warranty and backing of the company.  In this case, I’m quite confident in the track record of Savage Arms. After almost 500 rounds through the 555E, the gun is just as tight and capable as it was coming out of the box.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $516

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Categories: Gun News

Colt’s ‘Old West’ Rimfire: The Stagecoach 22LR Rifle

General Gun News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 05:30

While not something Marshal Dillon would have ever carried, the Colt Stagecoach was made for less than a decade in the 1960s and 70s as a neat-o rimfire for those interested in the Old West. (All Photos: Richard Taylor/Guns.com)

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $664.98

Dating from when Black & White TV westerns were prime time fodder, the Colt Stagecoach rifle blended modern production with cowboy styling. In 1965, Colt was busy cranking out 600-series AR-15s and M16s for both the commercial and military market while keeping their classic M1911 and wheel gun lines alive as well.

However, for the nuclear family switching on their television sets at night, the airwaves were crowded with now-iconic shows such as Bonanza, Gunsmoke, Rawhide, and The Big Valley. These shows sparked a strong desire for all-things Wild West in both the young and the young at heart. Moving to take advantage of this, Colt introduced the Stagecoach.

The Stagecoach we have in the Guns.com Vault of Certified Used guns has a period Bushnell scope and a leather military-style sling

A semi-automatic rimfire .22LR with a painted aluminum receiver and walnut furniture, the Colt Stagecoach and the very similar Colt Colteer both debuted in 1965. While the Colteer had a longer 19.5-inch barrel and plain receiver, the Stagecoach was a more carbine-length plinker with a 16.5-inch barrel and 13-round under-barrel magazine tube. Pitched to cowboy-hat wearing youth of the era, the Stagecoach got its name from the engraved and gold-color-filled holdup scene on both sides of the receiver.

Other “Western” features included a saddle ring with a leather thong at the left (port) rear of the receiver and barrel band around the front forearm, the latter reminiscent of that seen on a lever gun. A hooded front sight and adjustable rear came standard.

The Colt Stagecoach currently in the Guns.com Vault of Certified Used Guns was built in 1973, according to Colt’s information. By that time, Gunsmoke was the only Western primetime television series still top-rated, with the others replaced by comedies such as M*A*S*H and Sandford & Son, and it would end its 480-episode run in 1975.

As for our rifle, only produced until about the mid-1970s, both the Colteer and Stagecoach fell out of favor with the culture shift. By the Disco-era, the line had closed on the series.

Today, these guns can still hold their own as plinkers but are hard to find in good condition due to the fact their painted receivers have often flaked and lost their color over decades of use. Likewise, it is hard to find one that still has the leather thong, saddle ring, sight hood, and barrel band intact.

Still, for fans of the thriving cattle range wars of the 1860s and 70s, or those looking to relive those 1960s and 70s TV dinners, the Stagecoach is a neat, if almost forgotten, a relic from those days.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $664.98

The post Colt’s ‘Old West’ Rimfire: The Stagecoach 22LR Rifle appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

New York Stretches Background Check Periods to 30 Days

General Gun News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 05:00

Pro-gun groups argued the bill, which stretches out the current three-day delays to as long as 30 days, could be deadly for those who want to purchase a firearm to protect themselves (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a new law Monday that would extend the waiting period for National Instant Criminal Background Check System delays on gun transfers from three days to 30.

Under current federal guidelines, Brady instant checks run through the FBI’s NICS system are returned in three categories: proceed, denied and delayed. Licensed firearm dealers can elect to proceed with an inconclusive delayed transfer after three days. Now, under A.2690 signed by Cuomo this week, unresolved delays must linger for a month before a gun can be transferred.

The measure passed the Democrat-controlled state legislature with largely partisan support on the encouragement of state and national gun control groups. Similar bills to eliminate the three-day “default-proceed” allowance tanked in the past two sessions when Republicans held a majority in the state Senate.

“I am proud to have written some of America’s toughest gun safety laws and to be part of a new New York Senate, which prioritizes the safety of our families and schools,” said Senate Deputy Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, who supported the bill. “I’m glad the Governor enacted this important measure.”

According to research from federal watchdogs, most NICS checks quickly result in either a proceed or denial with between 8 and 11 percent receiving a delay response, which can stay open for up to 88 days.

FBI data also shows that about 90 percent of denials over past felony convictions and 94 percent of the domestic violence protection order denials from 2006 through 2015 were identified within three business days. At the same time, nearly a fifth of denials during the same period were overturned on appeal, often due to mistaken identity or faulty court records.

Second Amendment groups opposed the New York expansion with the National Rifle Association saying during its legislative process that, “This bill will have disastrous and potentially deadly consequences for some, including women who want to purchase a firearm to protect themselves against domestic abusers.”

The post New York Stretches Background Check Periods to 30 Days appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Daniel Defense Adds 5 New Rifles to DD5 Line

General Gun News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 04:30

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $2,374

Georgia-based Daniel Defense continues to grow their DD5 series AR line with new rifles chambered in .260 Rem, 6.5 Creedmoor, and .308 Win. Designed for increased accuracy and reliability, the DD5 series features a cold hammer-forged chrome-line barrel with a two-position gas block that is adjustable for shooting with or without a suppressor.

The new guns also come standard with upgraded ambidextrous controls — bolt catch, magazine release, safety selector — as well as improved furniture and a redesigned charging handle with anti-gas features. All utilize an M-LOK free-floating rail system and accepts SR-25 magazines. For reliability, they feature a super finished and DLC-coated bolt carrier group with a buffer.

The five new rifles added to the series include a DD5V3 with a 16-inch barrel in .308, the DD5V4 with an 18-inch barrel in 6.5CM and .308, and the 20-inch barreled DD5V5 in 6.5CM and .260.

(Photos: Daniel Defense)

The DD5V3 in .308 Win uses a 16-inch S2W (Strength-to-Weight) barrel with a 1:11 twist. Overall length is 39-inches with the stock fully extended while weight, unloaded, is 8.35-pounds.

The DD5V4 in 6.5CM uses an 18-inch S2W barrel with a 1:8 twist. Overall length is 37-inches with the stock fully extended while weight, unloaded, is 8.6-pounds.

The DD5V4 in .308 Win uses an 18-inch S2W barrel with a 1:11 twist. Overall length is 37-inches with the stock fully extended while weight, unloaded, is 8.6-pounds.

The DD5V5 in 6.5CM uses a 20-inch S2W barrel with a 1:8 twist. Overall length is 41.5-inches with the stock fully extended while weight, unloaded, is 8.9-pounds.

The DD5V5 in .260 Rem uses a 20-inch S2W barrel with a 1:7 twist. Overall length is 41.5-inches with the stock fully extended while weight, unloaded, is 8.9-pounds.

MSRP across the line is $2,499.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $2,374

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Categories: Gun News

Nighthawk Custom Launches Counselor Pistol at TriggrCon 2019

General Gun News - Tue, 07/30/2019 - 04:00

Nighthawk Custom debuted a brand new 1911 style pistol at TriggrCon held in Bellevue, Washington last week. The Counselor, touted as a concealed carry pistol, comes chambered in 9mm with a 3.5-inch barrel.

Measuring 5.12-inches in height, the Counselor features an overall length of 7.01-inches. The Counselor doesn’t come with a light rail, but the company has packed it with other features to appease concealed carriers.

The G10 Scales are thinner than most 1911 grips on the market. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

The pistol has been outfitted with thin G10 Scales Grips to reduce its size, bringing it to a smaller size for concealed carry. The gun maker says the grips are the thinnest available to 1911 consumers. The grip area also comes sporting a grip safety under the beavertail. This grip safety brings an added layer of protection to those that prefer an external safety of sorts.

Boasting an 8+1 capacity, the Counselor offers an aluminum frame with new slide serrations the company calls “positive serrations.” Nighthawk Custom explained to Guns.com at Triggrcon that “positive” serrations introduce protrusions from the slide that offer a more unique look and feel while granting users more purchase for press-checks.

The pistol comes with “positive” serrations. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

In addition to the new serrations, Nighthawk Custom bestows a Flush-Fit Magwell onto the design. The Flush-Fit Magwell allows the Counselor to measure the same length as an officer frame, but with a magwell. The Counselor’s design is finished with an ultra-high undercut triggerguard allowing a multitude of hands to fit the frame.

The Counselor from Nighthawk Custom is available now with a hefty MSRP of $3,799.

The Counselor offers a slimmed-down approach to 1911 carry. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Looking for a new handgun? check out Guns.com’s full inventory of new and certified used handguns.

The post Nighthawk Custom Launches Counselor Pistol at TriggrCon 2019 appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

NY Gov. Cuomo Signs Bills to Extend Waits, Ban (Already Banned) Bump Stocks

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Mon, 07/29/2019 - 15:33

What Cuomo did, then, is ban an innocuous piece of plastic that was already prohibited under federal law because like so many other politicians he knows virtually nothing about firearms nor the existing laws regulating them.

The post NY Gov. Cuomo Signs Bills to Extend Waits, Ban (Already Banned) Bump Stocks appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Air Venturi Licensed M1 Carbine BB Rifles Now Shipping

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Mon, 07/29/2019 - 14:24

Teaming up with Springfield, Air Venturi is pleased to announce two new M1 Carbine replicas, a .177-caliber BB gun and a skirmish-ready airsoft rifle.

The post Air Venturi Licensed M1 Carbine BB Rifles Now Shipping appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Upland Bird Hunting Guns for All Price Points

General Gun News - Mon, 07/29/2019 - 13:00

Finding a quality over/under double-barreled shotgun can be tricky business. Is buying cheap the best way to go if you don’t know what you want? Or should you pony up cash to buy top-of-the-line so you have a gun that lasts? Guns.com, with a little help from the used gun vault, shows off a variety of new and used doubles that span price ranges from budget-friendly to collector-quality. Each of them has the features, build, and looks that an uplander hunter will love at prices that just might be a pleasant surprise.

Ruger Red Label

Though the Ruger Red Label O/U’s have risen in and out of favor — and production — over the years, fans of the American-made double have never faltered. Though again out of manufacture after a brief re-run in the aughts, demand for Red Labels remains. Initially, William Ruger saw a need for an O/U that would be priced more affordably than the Browning Superposed and Citori family of doubles. His design has been the only Ruger shotgun, and whether for birding or clays, the Red Label remains a solid option–when shooters can find them on the used market, that is.

Just so happens, uplanders are in luck. Our T&E Ruger Red Label comes from the Guns.com Vault, and this particular specimen is a rare bird indeed. Chambered not for the more common 12-or 20-, but rather, 28-gauge on a true small frame. Further, this is not the blued receiver but the stainless version. Our test Red Label wears 26-inch barrels fitted with interchangeable chokes and a straight English-style stock rather than the more common semi-pistol grip.

The lightweight Red Label in 28-gauge, built on a true small-frame, swings quickly on both birds and clays and looks just as good as it shoots. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

Speaking of wood, the walnut stocks wear classy checkering and some fine figure to boot. The gun weighs in just a hair under six pounds, svelte and attractive as well as a true deadly pleasure in the field. Used price at the Vault is $2,166. If a more potent 12-gauge is a better suitor, check the Vault for those as well.

The single selective trigger and tang-safety-selector are nice, though the automatically-engaging safety takes some practice for those not accustomed to it. We blasted clays with the 28-gauge and it hung right in there with the bigger gauges, hitting true to point of aim and patterning well.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $1,624.98

Charles Daly Field

The Charles Daly name has found its way onto so many shotguns over the years, its difficult to know what shooters are getting from the used racks. But in the way of older O/U shotguns, plenty of well-made upland bird and clay guns exist under the brand. One such trustworthy model that was never fully appreciated in its time but is quite coveted today is the BC Miroku built Charles Daly O/U shotgun. Quality on the Italian and Turkish made versions varied widely from fine to floppy. Astute gunners, however, will recognize the Miroku name from the side of Browning Citori shotguns, which come at a much, much higher price point.

There’s no better place than the sporting clays course when upland bird seasons are closed, and both the Charles Daly Field 12-gauge and Ruger Red Label 28-gauge from the Guns.com Vault made great clay-busting companions. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

The Guns.com Vault has multiple used Daly options at the moment, with several Miroku’s among them, priced in the $630-$840 in different variants. Our T&E gun comes from the Vault and is a 12-gauge with 30-inch vent rib barrels and fixed Full/Full chokes. This double wears a gold-plated single trigger with the tang safety and selector.  The gun is tight, comes up and swings like a dream, and would be great for either clays or upland birds.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $631.98

Browning Superposed or Citori

One of the most revered over-under shotguns in the American upland birding fields and clays courses is some variant of the Browning Superposed or its Citori successor. Original round-knob Superposed doubles were made in Belgium with great attention to detail, and their quality today comes at a premium price and collectability. Our 12-gauge with 28-inch barrels is a nicely engraved Pigeon grade that has been well-loved over the years and is more a hunter than a safe-queen.

The Browning timeline progressed from Belgian-made Superposed to the similar, albeit feature-upgraded Citori line of O/U’s with interchangeable chokes and many more options.

Three of the four in our test wear silver receivers. Most wear lovely engraving and all have barrel selectors, and that goes to show that even more inexpensive guns needn’t sacrifice looks or performance. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

Many of the later manufacture Citori doubles came out of the Japanese Miroku plant, a name recognizable on the Charles Daly above. While the original Superposed pieces are as collectible now as they are good shooters, the newer manufacture Citori’s are available with many specialty variants from sporting clays to skeet to all types of hunting editions. As far as our test goes, both the Superposed and Citori represent the top of the cost market, but quality is also concurrent with price, generally running $1,500 – $2,700 on both used and new forums.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $2,199.99

Stevens 555

There has always been a market for affordable O/U shotguns, but Savage has not been a legit player in that game until fairly recently. The Stevens by Savage Model 555 doubles first came out in 12- and 20 gauge, followed quickly by 28 and 410 as well. But now, life is complete, for the company has begun shipping the new 555 and 555E in 16-gauge, one of the most underrated upland and clay guns yet.

The 16-gauge 555’s wear 28-inch chrome lined, carbon steel barrels. Many folks, myself included, appreciate having interchangeable chokes for different types of hunting, and the 555 ships with five tubes in a small hard case. There’s a single selective mechanical trigger as well as an easily operable tang safety. Length of pull is a standard 14.5-inches. The vent rib barrels are finished with a simple brass bead.

While some of the older guns have fixed chokes, the newer ones offer interchangeable tubes. Both the Stevens 555 and Ruger Red Label come with flush mount, interchangeable chokes. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

The lightweight aluminum 555 receivers are not only reinforced with steel, but also built to scale, meaning the company is not merely swapping barrels and gauges on a single bulky frame. Sub-gauges get their own appropriately scaled-down receivers. The guns are Turkish-made by KOFS, and while many are quick to scoff, Turkey is putting out some lasting guns these days. While quality can vary widely, a company like Savage maintains control, and the differences are obvious over some of the cheaper Turk doubles from other companies with overseas factories.

Shooters can choose between the blued Model 555 with manual extractors or the upgraded 555E with its silver receiver, engraving, upgraded wood, and dual ejectors. MSRP runs $705- $879, with real world prices considerably lower.

A Fine Collection of Over/Unders

These fine guns are proof that O/U’s of all price points make ready companions for shooting birds of either live or clay variety. Whether you spend $600 or $2,600, the expectation should never change for a gun that patterns well, has features and options for hunters, and looks the part as well. Of the guns on our list, three of the four wear silver receivers, though all have blued options. Most wear lovely engraving and all have barrel selectors, tang safeties, and vent rib barrels. That goes to show that even more cost-effective guns needn’t sacrifice looks or performance. Buying either the cheapest or the most expensive is seldom the wisest option, and with guns like these, it needn’t be. Regardless of choice of O/U, the most important thing is finding an gun that fits well and get you out in the field.

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