Gun News

Kirsten Joy Weiss gets personal in NRA interview (VIDEO)

General Gun News - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:52

Pro shooter Kirsten Joy Weiss was recently interviewed by NRA All Access and shared a bit about the mission behind her YouTube channel, how she got her start as a professional sharp shooter, and some obstacles she had to overcome along the way. Weiss, a self-declared supporter of guns and freedom, also shared how the trick shots she’s so famous for came to be.

The post Kirsten Joy Weiss gets personal in NRA interview (VIDEO) appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads

General Gun News - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:00

Winchester PDX1 Buck and Ball load, dissected. Three 0000, .380 diameter, buck pellets, a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, wad, Teflon sleeve and a three inch Fiocci hull. The Teflon wrapper was incorporated to reduce friction between the payload and the bore. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

In the days when smoothbore flintlock muskets were the weapons of choice for armies worldwide, one of the tricks used by soldiers to increase the effectiveness of their less than accurate weapons was to add a few pellets of buckshot to the usual payload of a large diameter lead roundball. Known as a “Buck and Ball” load, the idea behind the configuration was to combine the decisive impact of a big, heavy lead ball with the potential for hits on multiple targets afforded by the buckshot. Such a load was reported to have been particularly effective in combat situations where tightly packed rows of troops were firing on each other at close ranges. In the Americas, buck and ball musket loads were used in conflicts as late as the Civil War.

The concept of a buck and ball load may be an old one but it is not forgotten. Two fairly well-known products that contain such payloads are Multi-Defense Buckshot offered by the Italian ammo maker Centurion and the 12 gauge PDX1 rounds offered by Winchester.

The payload of the Centurion shells consist of a .650 inch diameter roundball placed atop six #1 (.30 inch diameter) buckshot pellets inside a 2.75 inch hull. The advertised muzzle velocity is 1300 f/s.  The 2.75 inch 12 PDX1 rounds pack a payload consisting of three 00 buckshot pellets seated over a one ounce rifled slug, all of  which leave the muzzle at an advertised velocity of 1150 f/s.

I was curious to see how such loads would group and pattern at ranges of 15 feet and 25 yards, so I obtained a box of both the Centurion and the Winchester buck and ball offerings.  Additionally, I was unable to resist the urge to make my own 12 gauge buck and ball handload. Feeling a perhaps unhealthy need to outdo the manufacturers in terms of payload mass and projectile diameter, my homemade buck and ball rounds consisted of three 0000 (.380 diameter) buck pellets atop a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, all inside a three inch Fiocci hull. The powder charge consisted of 35 grains of Alliant Blue Dot and the payload was buffered and wrapped in a Teflon sleeve. Total payload mass was just under 1.875 ounce.

Since this load is essentially my own invention, anyone attempting to duplicate it does so at their own risk. It worked well in my Benelli Nova, but the results may vary. Since I do not chronograph shotshell loads, the velocity of the handload is unknown.

Each load was tested by first firing three rounds at a 14 inch by 11 inch target at a range of 15 feet, which I consider to be an “across the room” distance. The loads were then tested at a range of 25 yards by firing three rounds of each at a 22 inch by 14 inch target. All loads were fired through my pump action Benelli Nova with an 18 inch barrel and fixed improved cylinder choke.

Centurion 2.75 inch Multi Defense Buckshot

At 15 feet, the roundball portion of the payload clustered into a cloverleaf group at the very center of the 14 inch by 11 inch target. It was hard to tell exactly how many buckshot hit the target as some holes made by the pellets could have easily been obscured by the holes made by the roundballs and wad components. The maximum diameter of the pattern was eight inches.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 foot test of the Centurion load. The contents of all three rounds clustered fairly tightly near the center of the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At 25 yards, the roundballs strung along a six inch diagonal line near the center of the target. I could verify that 12 of the 21 buckshot hit the target. Some of the holes made by the buckshot may have been obscured by the holes punched by the roundballs while the rest likely did not hit the paper. Of all loads tested during the range session, the Centurions recoiled the least.

At 25 yards, the pattern opened up significantly. Some of the buckshot missed the target entirely. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Winchester, 2.75 inch PDX1 12 gauge

At 15 feet, the three slugs tore a ragged hole through the targets bullseye and I was able to verify that all nine buckshot stayed on target. At its widest point, the pattern measured eight inches diameter.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 yard, three shot group of Winchester PDX1 ammo. The slugs tore a ragged hole and all buckshot hit the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At a distance of 25 yards, the slugs grouped into three inches just above the bullseye, but only three buckshot wound up on the paper. Recoil was on par with most other one ounce 12 gauge slug loads I’ve fired.

At 25 yards the slugs from the PDX1 rounds printed a reasonably tight group. Only three of 21 buckshot pellets struck the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Handloaded .718 inch diameter roundball plus three 0000 buckshot

The three shot group/pattern yielded by my handload at 15 feet put all roundballs within 1.5 inches of each other and all nine buckshot on the target for a total spread that was seven inches at its widest point. Upon extending the distance to 25 yards however, the pattern opened up significantly. The roundballs grouped into a triangular pattern that was four inches on each side and only three buckshot hit the paper.

The target above shows the group and pattern printed by the author’s buck and ball handload. The roundballs clustered close together and all the buckshot stayed inside a seven inch circle. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

While I did not test any of the above loads for terminal performance, it stands to reason that all three loads would create a devastating wound in a home invader at the distances commonly found within the average home. Admittedly, at such close ranges a standard slug or buckshot load will also create a devastating wound. Additionally, I’m not convinced that at close ranges, the 12 gauge buck and ball loads increase the likelihood of a hit when compared to standard buckshot loads.

At 25 yards, the roundballs in the author’s handloads grouped acceptably close together. Only three buckshot pellets struck the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At longer ranges, the roundballs are still accurate enough to stay within a torso-sized target, but a bulk of the buckshot fly wide of the target, resulting in unaccounted for projectiles. Additionally, heavy slugs and roundballs may create an overpenetration hazard in some situations.

While it may be debatable as to whether or not modern buck and ball loads offer a practical advantage over standard slug and buckshot loads, they may be just the right ammo to grab in the event that a column of angry redcoats gathers on your lawn.

The post Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads

General Gun News - Fri, 06/23/2017 - 06:00

Winchester PDX1 Buck and Ball load, dissected. Three 0000, .380 diameter, buck pellets, a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, wad, Teflon sleeve and a three inch Fiocci hull. The Teflon wrapper was incorporated to reduce friction between the payload and the bore. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

In the days when smoothbore flintlock muskets were the weapons of choice for armies worldwide, one of the tricks used by soldiers to increase the effectiveness of their less than accurate weapons was to add a few pellets of buckshot to the usual payload of a large diameter lead roundball. Known as a “Buck and Ball” load, the idea behind the configuration was to combine the decisive impact of a big, heavy lead ball with the potential for hits on multiple targets afforded by the buckshot. Such a load was reported to have been particularly effective in combat situations where tightly packed rows of troops were firing on each other at close ranges. In the Americas, buck and ball musket loads were used in conflicts as late as the Civil War.

The concept of a buck and ball load may be an old one but it is not forgotten. Two fairly well-known products that contain such payloads are Multi-Defense Buckshot offered by the Italian ammo maker Centurion and the 12 gauge PDX1 rounds offered by Winchester.

The payload of the Centurion shells consist of a .650 inch diameter roundball placed atop six #1 (.30 inch diameter) buckshot pellets inside a 2.75 inch hull. The advertised muzzle velocity is 1300 f/s.  The 2.75 inch 12 PDX1 rounds pack a payload consisting of three 00 buckshot pellets seated over a one ounce rifled slug, all of  which leave the muzzle at an advertised velocity of 1150 f/s.

I was curious to see how such loads would group and pattern at ranges of 15 feet and 25 yards, so I obtained a box of both the Centurion and the Winchester buck and ball offerings.  Additionally, I was unable to resist the urge to make my own 12 gauge buck and ball handload. Feeling a perhaps unhealthy need to outdo the manufacturers in terms of payload mass and projectile diameter, my homemade buck and ball rounds consisted of three 0000 (.380 diameter) buck pellets atop a .718 inch diameter, 550 grain lead roundball, all inside a three inch Fiocci hull. The powder charge consisted of 35 grains of Alliant Blue Dot and the payload was buffered and wrapped in a Teflon sleeve. Total payload mass was just under 1.875 ounce.

Since this load is essentially my own invention, anyone attempting to duplicate it does so at their own risk. It worked well in my Benelli Nova, but the results may vary. Since I do not chronograph shotshell loads, the velocity of the handload is unknown.

Each load was tested by first firing three rounds at a 14 inch by 11 inch target at a range of 15 feet, which I consider to be an “across the room” distance. The loads were then tested at a range of 25 yards by firing three rounds of each at a 22 inch by 14 inch target. All loads were fired through my pump action Benelli Nova with an 18 inch barrel and fixed improved cylinder choke.

Centurion 2.75 inch Multi Defense Buckshot

At 15 feet, the roundball portion of the payload clustered into a cloverleaf group at the very center of the 14 inch by 11 inch target. It was hard to tell exactly how many buckshot hit the target as some holes made by the pellets could have easily been obscured by the holes made by the roundballs and wad components. The maximum diameter of the pattern was eight inches.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 foot test of the Centurion load. The contents of all three rounds clustered fairly tightly near the center of the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At 25 yards, the roundballs strung along a six inch diagonal line near the center of the target. I could verify that 12 of the 21 buckshot hit the target. Some of the holes made by the buckshot may have been obscured by the holes punched by the roundballs while the rest likely did not hit the paper. Of all loads tested during the range session, the Centurions recoiled the least.

At 25 yards, the pattern opened up significantly. Some of the buckshot missed the target entirely. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Winchester, 2.75 inch PDX1 12 gauge

At 15 feet, the three slugs tore a ragged hole through the targets bullseye and I was able to verify that all nine buckshot stayed on target. At its widest point, the pattern measured eight inches diameter.

The photo above shows the results of the 15 yard, three shot group of Winchester PDX1 ammo. The slugs tore a ragged hole and all buckshot hit the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At a distance of 25 yards, the slugs grouped into three inches just above the bullseye, but only three buckshot wound up on the paper. Recoil was on par with most other one ounce 12 gauge slug loads I’ve fired.

At 25 yards the slugs from the PDX1 rounds printed a reasonably tight group. Only three of 21 buckshot pellets struck the target. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

Handloaded .718 inch diameter roundball plus three 0000 buckshot

The three shot group/pattern yielded by my handload at 15 feet put all roundballs within 1.5 inches of each other and all nine buckshot on the target for a total spread that was seven inches at its widest point. Upon extending the distance to 25 yards however, the pattern opened up significantly. The roundballs grouped into a triangular pattern that was four inches on each side and only three buckshot hit the paper.

The target above shows the group and pattern printed by the author’s buck and ball handload. The roundballs clustered close together and all the buckshot stayed inside a seven inch circle. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

While I did not test any of the above loads for terminal performance, it stands to reason that all three loads would create a devastating wound in a home invader at the distances commonly found within the average home. Admittedly, at such close ranges a standard slug or buckshot load will also create a devastating wound. Additionally, I’m not convinced that at close ranges, the 12 gauge buck and ball loads increase the likelihood of a hit when compared to standard buckshot loads.

At 25 yards, the roundballs in the author’s handloads grouped acceptably close together. Only three buckshot pellets struck the paper. (Photo: Jason Wimbiscus)

At longer ranges, the roundballs are still accurate enough to stay within a torso-sized target, but a bulk of the buckshot fly wide of the target, resulting in unaccounted for projectiles. Additionally, heavy slugs and roundballs may create an overpenetration hazard in some situations.

While it may be debatable as to whether or not modern buck and ball loads offer a practical advantage over standard slug and buckshot loads, they may be just the right ammo to grab in the event that a column of angry redcoats gathers on your lawn.

The post Buck and ball: An age old military tactic meets modern self-defense loads appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Faxon Introducing Match Series Barrels, also New Barrels from BAD

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 23:30

Faxon Firearms and Battle Arms Development are adding new match grade .223 Wylde, 9mm, 300 BLK and .308 Win. barrels to their catalogs.

The post Faxon Introducing Match Series Barrels, also New Barrels from BAD appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Canadian sniper smashes world record with 2 mile kill shot in Iraq

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 23:05

A Canadian sniper fires his weapon at the Batoche Small Arms Range in September 2013. (Photo: Cpl Claude Arseneault/Canadian Army)

Military officials confirmed Thursday that a sniper with Canada’s strategic-level counter-terrorism forces smashed the record for longest confirmed kill shot in military history with a distance of 3,540 meters.

A member of the secretive Joint Task Force 2 fired the deadly round from a McMillan TAC-50, killing an ISIS fighter in Iraq from more than 2 miles away. The kill shot crushes the previous record, which was 2,475 meters, according to Toronto’s Globe and Mail.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” a military source told the paper. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

The sniper fired the world record round from a high rise during an operation sometime in the last month. The bullet took less than 10 seconds to strike the insurgent. Officials say the kill was verified with video footage.

“Hard data on this. It isn’t an opinion. It isn’t an approximation. There is a second location with eyes on with all the right equipment to capture exactly what the shot was,” an official said.

The two man sniper team had to account for distance, wind, and the curvature of the earth. The kill required not only precise ammunition and weaponry, but good eyes and some math — not to mention training.

“Canada has a world-class sniper system. It is not just a sniper. They work in pairs. There is an observer,” a military source told the Globe and Mail. “This is a skill set that only a very few people have.”

Canadian Armed Forces officials wouldn’t provide details on when or how the kill took place. JTF2 operations are classified and the government doesn’t often comment about what they’re up to. Canadian forces in Iraq serve an “advise and assist” function, and a maximum number of 830 members are approved to take part in operations.

British sniper Craig Harrison held the previous record using a .338 Lapua Magnum rifle to kill a Talban gunner in 2009.

The post Canadian sniper smashes world record with 2 mile kill shot in Iraq appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Ruling granting access to dash cam video in Pennsylvania may not last long

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 15:45

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled 5-2 in favor of allowing police dash cam video from car accidents to be released to the public, but the ruling may not last very long.

The ruling stems from a March 2014 right-to-know request from Michelle Grove. She wanted dash cam video from an accident her friend was involved in, but state police denied the request, citing a criminal investigative records exemption, according to the ruling.

Grove didn’t give up. A couple months later, she appealed that denial to the state’s open records office. The office granted her request, but then state police appealed the decision in court. Tuesday’s ruling upheld the decision to grant Grove access to the videos, making dash cam videos public records unless police can prove a specific exemption.

“Citizens should care because it gives them the ability to access police dash camera video, which will help them understand police interaction in the community and provide accountability,” said Melissa Melewsky, who filed a friend of the court brief in the case on behalf of a newspaper trade group in Pennsylvania.

While narrow in the scope of release, the decision opens up the state’s tightly held police videos. But the ruling may soon be moot, as the state legislature is taking up a bill that would exempt dash cam and body cam videos from right-to-know requests.

Senate Bill 560 would give police departments discretion in which requests to honor or refuse. The bill has passed both chambers, and state Sen. Stewart Greenleaf said he expects the bill to head to the governor by the end of the week. Gov. Tom Wolf has said he supports the measure.

“There are significant public access problems with Senate Bill 560,” said Melewsky.

The post Ruling granting access to dash cam video in Pennsylvania may not last long appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Gun owners disagree about essential safety precautions in homes with kids

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 15:40

Americans who own guns and those who do not hold different views about which safety precautions prove essential in a home with both kids and firearms, according to a survey released this week.

The Pew Research Center said 66 percent of gun owners agreed their guns should be locked up compared with 90 percent of non-owners. Roughly 4 in 10 owners said guns should be kept unloaded with children in the house, compared to 7 out of 10 non-owners.

Only 26 percent of owners believed visitors with children should be advised of guns present in the home while 48 percent of non-owners felt the opposite way.

Pew questioned 3,930 adults in April and May about their views on guns. About one-third of those surveyed said they owned at least one gun.

While some issues both groups agreed near-universally on — such as parents should discuss gun safety with their children — others divided the owners from the non-owners sharply.

“The majority of Americans who don’t own guns feel it is also essential for gun owners with children living in the home to keep their guns unloaded and in a separate spot from the ammunition,” Pew said Thursday. “Gun owners disagree. Majorities say these measures are either important but not essential or not important, even in households with children.”

The post Gun owners disagree about essential safety precautions in homes with kids appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Pistol Caliber Carbines, The Next Big Thing?

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 15:04

Pistol caliber carbines are fun and cheap to shoot and it doesn’t hurt that they are chambered in 9mm Luger, one of the most popular centerfire round in the world. This makes them great companion carbine for shooters who already own a 9mm pistol.

The post Pistol Caliber Carbines, The Next Big Thing? appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Staying in The Black: The Thompson Center $263 Impact Muzzleloader – Full Review

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 13:26

Though the muzzleloading rifle market has quite a bit to offer, if this style of rifle isn’t your primary hunting tool a large investment may not make a lot of sense. For the hunter looking to extend their season, especially the later deer seasons, I personally feel the T/C Impact represents a good balance of useable features and affordability.

The post Staying in The Black: The Thompson Center $263 Impact Muzzleloader – Full Review appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

NRA to give firearms training to lawmakers, staff

NRA-ILA News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 13:19
The National Rifle Association has agreed to provide firearms training to House and Senate lawmakers and their staffs in the wake of this month's baseball gun attack. At the urging of Alabama Sen. Luther Strange, who had a staffer pitching at the time of the shooting by James Hodgkinson, 66, from Belleville, Ill., the NRA said it is ready to help. "There is no doubt that the heinous attack that occurred in Virginia last week would have been even worse without the heroic actions of the Capitol Police," wrote Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA's lobby shop, the Institute for Legislative Action.
Categories: Gun News

New Orleans buy back at church nets more than 100 guns

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 12:43

St. Roch Community Church in New Orleans. (Photo: Sojourn Fellowship)

A gun buy back event held in the St. Roch neighborhood of New Orleans netted over 100 guns last weekend.

The Associated Press reported the “no questions asked” buy back was the second such event to take place in New Orleans.

Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey indicated 67 pistols, 19 shotguns and 26 rifles were turned in at St. Roch Community Church, with $100 doled out for handguns and $200 for “assault weapons.”

Only working guns were accepted and a there was a five-gun-per-person limit.

Ramsey said the event was meant to offer the people of New Orleans a way to anonymously dispose of unwanted firearms and would hopefully help to reduce gun violence in the city.

According to Times-Picayune data, there have already been 92 murders in New Orleans in 2017. There were a total of 175 murders in 2016.

The post New Orleans buy back at church nets more than 100 guns appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Canadian Sniper Sets World Record with 2-Mile Kill Shot on ISIS Forces

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 12:22

A Canadian sniper shot and killed an Islamic State fighter from 2.1 miles (3,781 yds) away last month, setting a world record for the longest recorded sniper kill.

The post Canadian Sniper Sets World Record with 2-Mile Kill Shot on ISIS Forces appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Gunfighter Tip of the Week: Easy DIY Grip Enhancement for Pistols

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 11:39

Rubber: It's not just for shore leave and impromptu trips to Tijuana.  

The post Gunfighter Tip of the Week: Easy DIY Grip Enhancement for Pistols appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Orlando felon gets 15 years for illegal firearms possession

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 11:31

An Orlando man was sentenced Wednesday to 15 years in prison for being a felon in possession of a firearm.

According to a Justice Department news release, 37-year-old Mario Donate Lockhart pleaded guilty to the charge in March 2017 and was sentenced as an armed career criminal due to his multiple prior felony convictions.

On Aug. 29, 2016, Lockhart held up a loaded semiautomatic firearm and threatened to kill someone. He then pointed the gun at someone else as Orlando police officers arrived at the scene.

The officers ordered Lockhart to drop the weapon, but the man instead fled the scene with gun in hand. Shortly after, he was arrested and the gun recovered.

The ATF and Orlando Police Department investigated the case. It was prosecuted as part of the Justice Department’s Project Safe Neighborhoods Program, which is meant to reduce gun violence in communities around the country.

The post Orlando felon gets 15 years for illegal firearms possession appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Building a your own short barreled, pistol grip shotgun on a budget (and legally)

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 11:23

My home assembled, $258 short barreled pistol grip shotgun. If the shooter doesn’t like the pistol grip, he can switch the gun back to a full stock. (Photo: David LaPell)

In the last couple of months, the shotgun world has been taken by surprise with Mossberg’s introduction of the 590 Shockwave and on its heels Remington’s response with the 870 Tac-14. Both have redefined what a personal defense shotgun can be. They are both in 12 gauge, both have 14 inch barrels and both feature the same Shockwave Raptor pistol grip.

Short barreled shotguns themselves are nothing new. Coach guns and cut downs have been around since the horse was the only way to get to town. And these guns managed to hold on into the 1980s and 90s with the rare offerings like the Remington 870  Witness Protection — a weapon that found favor with the US Marshals. The issue has always been legality and, while I won’t go into all the details here, it seems that someone at Mossberg did their research. The result is a weapon that many gun owners could not have bought without a tax and in some states not at all.

While this is all great news, after looking at a 590 Shockwave, I began to wonder if I could not come up with an alternative that would be more cost effective and avoid any potential legal headaches among the states and localities.

For those wanting to save money, Mossberg makes an aftermarket barrel for the Remington 870 that’s cheaper than that produced by Remington. (Photo: David LaPell)

The secret behind both the 590 Shockwave and the Remington 870 Tac-14 is that, even though they both have a 14-inch barrel, the Raptor grip, which is put on at the factory so the gun was never a true modified shotgun and instead a “firearm,” still has an overall length of 26 inches  (26 and a third according to both manufacturers). The problem is, if you don’t like the grip on either gun, too bad, you’re stuck with it. You cannot legally put on another pistol grip or a full length buttstock.

I decided against buying either of these two because of the tight budget that I am on. I didn’t want a gun I might not like shooting, only to end up turning around and reselling it because I couldn’t change it. So I decided to see if I could make a gun as handy and as useful as the 590 Shockwave or the Tac-14.

I began by searching the local gun shops and was not disappointed. I found a barely used Remington 870 Special Purpose in 12 gauge. It had a 23 inch fully rifled slug barrel with a black synthetic stock. The shop owner was having a hard time selling it, in part because of the barrel which limited it to big game hunters. I learned in the past that that those barrels can be resold —  someone always wants one — so I worked out a deal for the gun and got it for $290.

The Hogue Tamer grip soaks up a lot of recoil from stout loads like 00 buckshot. (Photo: David LaPell)

I set out buying parts but I knew I wasn’t going to buy a single thing until I had sold the barrel. After putting it online, it sold for $140. The original buttstock, with its Monte Carlo design, would be too tall for a simple bead, so it went along with the factory forearm, which would be too long for a side saddle. I got $25 for both. I found a new aftermarket barrel that is 18.5 inches long for $103. I also found a Hogue Tamer forearm and pistol grip set for $30. Once all the tallying was done and the parts swapping finished, I had a gun that I put a grand total of $258 into, about $150 less then either a new Tac-14 or 590 Shockwave.

Now you might be saying that standard pistol grip shotguns are uncomfortable, especially compared to the new Raptor grip. While that might be true to others, I find the Hogue Tamer grip is not that bad at all with recoil. I tested it by shooting some Remington 2.75 inch 00 buckshot and I found it was not painful or unpleasant. Now I might eventually get a Raptor grip later on but for now the Tamer grip is just fine. The Remington 870 with the 18.5 inch barrel and Hogue Tamer pistol grip ended up being 28.5 inches long, just a little more than two inches difference between it and the 590 Shockwave and Tac-14.

Shooting from the hip with a pistol grip shotgun is not as accurate as looking down the barrel and using the sight. (Photo: David LaPell)

Now the big issue with pistol grip shotguns is that few people understand how to really shoot them. Yes, they can be shot from the hip but it takes more practice to learn because you’re not actually aiming the gun and past a few yards it’s pretty much worthless. The proper way is to hold the gun out away from your face but still looking down the barrel. I took two shots at seven yards with my 870 after the modifications, one from the hip and the other aimed with some #4 buckshot. The hip shot was high and to the left, barely on target. The aimed shot was center mass and no, I didn’t lose any teeth. This is because the gun was held properly away from my face.

I imagine many people are asking why all the fuss over pistol grip shotguns in the first place. They do have their place: as a truck gun, for camping or home defense, but they do take practice and getting used to. I like them because a few years back I suffered an injury and I have a harder time using a full stock shotgun, so for me it’s a matter of practicality and convenience. If for some reason however I was ever going to put another buttstock on this gun, I could — something that’s not possible with the 590 Shockwave or the Tac-14.

The Remington 870 with a 18.5 inch barrel and Hogue Tamer is only 28.5 inches long, only a couple inches more than a 590 Shockwave or Tac-14. (Photo: David LaPell)

For those who don’t like buying used guns, I would suggest that since this is something you are not likely to shoot all day long at a range like you would a skeet gun, something like a Maverick 88 would suffice. Even after buying the pistol grip, I doubt you would be out more than $250 and again, you could put a buttstock back on if you so desired.

The Mossberg 590 Shockwave and the Remington 870 Tac-14 are both great ideas, but they are not the last word on the subject of short barreled shotguns. You can make your own legally with more options and for less money. No matter what choice you make, get out to the range and practice and learn how to shoot the gun. Find out its strengths and weaknesses. You’ll be surprised to find that these little pistol grip shotguns have more uses than you can shake a boomstick at.

The post Building a your own short barreled, pistol grip shotgun on a budget (and legally) appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Rhode Island House advances bill to seize guns from domestic violence offenders

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 11:02

The Rhode Island House Judiciary Committee approved a bill Wednesday that would allow authorities to take guns away from domestic violence offenders and people under domestic restraining orders.

The Associated Press reported the measure — H5110, also called the Protect Rhode Island Families Act — passed on a 13-5 vote and will now head to the full House for consideration.

Most Democrats voted for the bill, while most Republicans voted against it. The exception was Democratic Rep. Cale Keable, the committee’s chairman, who voted against the proposal.

The bill would essentially require individuals subject to domestic restraining orders and those convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence offenses to surrender their firearms.

Under current state law, guns can be taken away from those convicted of felony assault, but someone would have to be convicted of at least three domestic assaults before being charged with a felony.

The measure has the full support of domestic violence prevention advocates and also has a key ally in Democratic House Speaker Micholas Mattiello, who has characterized the proposal not as a gun control bill but as one aimed to protect domestic violence victims.

“I support the Second Amendment,” Mattiello said Tuesday. “That’s the framework I come from. So these are not intended to be anti-gun bills. These are domestic violence protection bills.”

The National Rifle Association has come out strongly against the legislation, with its Institute for Legislation Action calling it “nothing more than the centerpiece of a national gun control agenda being bankrolled by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.”

Similar legislation has also been introduced in the Rhode Island Senate.

The post Rhode Island House advances bill to seize guns from domestic violence offenders appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Colorado teachers receiving active shooter training

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 10:28

Some Colorado teachers are receiving active shooter training. (Photo: 9 News)

Some Colorado teachers have headed to the gun range instead of summer vacation in order to receive active shooter training in Weld County.

Colorado 9 News reported the group Coloradans for Civil Liberties paid for about 17 school staff members to receive FASTER Training, which stands for Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response.

“In a nutshell, it is training for teachers and other school staff who are armed first responders in their schools,” said Laura Carno, founder of the civil liberties group.

The program, first started in Ohio, offered scholarships to teachers and other school staff members in Colorado, many of whom are from rural districts.

“By and large rural school districts, who have made the decision that law enforcement is 30-45 minutes away,” Carno explained. “They are their own first responders.”

Ronnie Wilson, who hopes to start a K-12 charter school, was one of the first to fire some rounds at the training.

“I’m looking for every possible venue and avenue to ensure safety of students,” Wilson said.

Under current Colorado law, school staff members with permits can carry concealed guns in school so long as they have been designated as a security officer.

Carno noted Wilson was the only trainee willing to give his name, as knowing who is armed in a particular school might give an attacker a strategic advantage. She said many involved in the training are already carrying concealed firearms in their schools.

Some opponents of the program, like Tom Mauser of Colorado Ceasefire, argued the staff members won’t be receiving the same level of training as armed security guards.

Mauser, who lost his son in the 1999 Columbine High School shooting, said staff members carrying guns may cause more confusion for law enforcement arriving at an active shooter scene.

Those sentiments were echoed by Ken Toltz, the founder and co-chair of Safe Campus Colorado.

“The dangers of adding guns to a school environment are dramatically increased by allowing loaded lethal weapons into a school environment on a daily basis – as the promoters of FASTER envision,” Toltz said in statement provided to 9 News.

Toltz also said the program was started by the Ohio gun lobby and characterized it as an attempt to lay the foundation for another push to loosen gun laws in Colorado.

Carno disagreed, saying they were just trying to provide safety training.

The post Colorado teachers receiving active shooter training appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Iowa man gets 12 years for drug distribution connected to junkies’ 17 armed robberies

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 10:13

Luke Martin (top) was sentenced to 12-and-a-half years in prison on drug charges connected to 17 robberies committed by four of his co-defendants, Alexander Hamilton, Sarah Coe, Shelly Avery, and Chris Avery. (Photo: Des Moines Police Department)

A 57-year-old man from Des Moines, Iowa, was sentenced to serve 151 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for drug distribution charges that authorities say are related to a string of armed robberies.

Luke Martin, Jr. pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute hydromorphone (Dilaudid) in January. Co-defendants Alexander Hamilton, Sarah Coe, Shelly Avery, and Chris Avery – all of whom face various drug and robbery charges – are awaiting their sentences.

According to court documents, Martin distributed Dilaudid to Hamilton, who in turn supplied it to Coe, as well as Shelly Avery and Chris Avery, who are brother and sister. Authorities say the distribution of the drug led to at least 17 robberies in the Des Moines area over an 8-month period, as the defendants committed the crimes in order to obtain cash to purchase additional drugs.

The majority of the robberies were committed at various gas stations as employees were held at gunpoint. Coe and Shelly Avery are accused of being the lookout and getaway driver.

The five defendants were arrested and charged in November 2016. Following the arrests, Heather Shannon, who is the mother of Shelly and Chris Avery, called it “an embarrassment.”

“I raised my children not to be like that, and they never were until they got on the drugs,” Shannon told reporters, noting that both of her children are heroin addicts and she has tried – without success – for years to get them help.

But Shannon said her case is not unique.

“It’s not just my kids,” she said. “It’s all these kids out here that are on this drug.”

Shannon said Christopher was once a star wrestler and Shelly a star softball player in high school, but now both are faced with going to federal prison.

“These are kids that have everything going for them in their life, and then just got hooked on that one drug and it takes their life,” Shannon said.

The Department of Health and Human Services cites opioid abuse as a “serious public health issue,” claiming the lives of over 33,000 people in 2015 alone, roughly the same number who die by gunfire. That same year, an estimated 828,000 people used heroin, 135,000 for the first time.

The post Iowa man gets 12 years for drug distribution connected to junkies’ 17 armed robberies appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Caldwell USA introduces Pic Rail XLA Fixed Bipods

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:20

The Pic Rail XLA Bipods offer two sizes so shooters can dial in their preferred height. (Photo: Caldwell USA)

Caldwell USA launches Pic Rail XLA Fixed Bipods, touting a stable shooting platform that attaches easily to a range of pic rail forends.

The XLA features an integrated 1.5-inch long pic rail clamp fastens directly to a gun’s pic or quad rail. Promoting a collapsible design, the bipods stay affixed to a firearm for easy transport to and from the range or field.

The bipods were created with quick target acquisition in mind, boasting an adjustable cam lever lock for quick deployment as well as adjustable leg height to dial in the perfect position.

The XLA is available in two models — a 6-9-inch version and a 9-13-inch. The lightweight aluminum design on both variants allow for quick transport while soft rubber feet provide enhanced stability while shooting. The legs are spring loaded and feature lock out knobs.

Caldwell’s Pic Rail XLA Fixed Bipods are available online and retail for just under $50.

The post Caldwell USA introduces Pic Rail XLA Fixed Bipods appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Chinese food delivery driver turns the tables on trio of would-be robbers

General Gun News - Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:00

The driver first threw the food at the suspects before retrieving his handgun. (Photo: News 4 Jax)

An attempted robbery in Jacksonville on Tuesday evening was foiled by the intended target when he pulled a gun on his assailants.

According to a press release from the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, one of the suspects was shot, a second held at gunpoint, while the third suspect remains at large. The victim, however, was uninjured.

Police say the suspects placed an order with Hot Wok Chinese around 5:30 p.m. to be delivered to an address that was later determined to be an abandoned house.

When the driver, who has not been publicly identified, arrived at the house, he pulled into the driveway, walked up to the front door and knocked. The driver was greeted by two men, one of whom was armed with a gun with a laser trained on the victim’s face. The victim described the gun as a “black semi-automatic pistol.”

The suspects motioned the driver to enter the house as they said something to the effect of, “Come inside, it’s over, come inside.” The driver then turned around to leave, but was met by a third man who was also armed with a gun. The victim described the third suspect as having something, like a shirt, wrapped around his face, as to hide his identity.

Unbeknown to the suspects, the delivery driver was also armed. The delivery driver threw the bag of food at the third suspect, backed away from the door, quickly drew his Glock, and fired four to five shots at the suspects. The driver continued to back up until he crossed the street, then yelled out for neighbors to call the police.

When officers arrived, the driver was still holding one of the suspects at gunpoint, but the remaining two had fled from the scene. A short time later, police received a call from a man claiming he had been shot at a different location. Authorities soon determined that man was a suspect in the Chinese food robbery.

The two suspects were arrested and the third remains at large. None of their names have been released, but they are said to be in their early 20s.

Local reports indicate the delivery driver was carrying less than $200 at the time of the attempted robbery.

The post Chinese food delivery driver turns the tables on trio of would-be robbers appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Pages