Gun News

Technology Takes Shotgunning to the Next Level – Garmin Xero S1 Review

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Sat, 11/16/2019 - 06:53

The Garmin Xero S1: think of it as your magic wand for learning exactly what’s happening every time you miss a clay bird. It’s like Doppler radar for shotguns.

The post Technology Takes Shotgunning to the Next Level – Garmin Xero S1 Review appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

CZ’s New Tack Driver Comes Sized For Youth: CZ 457 Scout

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 18:59

I got my hands on the new 457 Scout rifle, the "youth" model of the new 457 lineup. I've been using it quite a bit and I'm impressed. Its approachable price tag belies the quality of its craftsmanship and its inherent accuracy.

The post CZ’s New Tack Driver Comes Sized For Youth: CZ 457 Scout appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

KAHR K9’s Silver Jubilee

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 18:42

The Kahr K9 played a significant role in defining the concealed carry gun of today and remains as relevant now as it was when it was introduced 25 years ago. Celebrating that longevity with this special edition model was not just a great idea – but perfectly executed.

The post KAHR K9’s Silver Jubilee appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

The Execution Slaying of Jesse James: Murdering a Murderer

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 15:33

Jesse James’ life of crime and mayhem lacked the glamor depicted in books and movies. Hounded and harassed to the end he was finally gunned down brutally by a friend.

The post The Execution Slaying of Jesse James: Murdering a Murderer appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

State of the Art: Brimstone Gunsmithing’s DeltaPoint Glock

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 09:36

The costs and wait times for the installation of red dot sights has kept many shooters stuck with iron sights. Brimstone Gunsmithing wants to help.

The post State of the Art: Brimstone Gunsmithing’s DeltaPoint Glock appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Kentucky: Committee to Consider Firearm Seizures Without Due Process

NRA-ILA News - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 06:52
On Friday, November 22nd, the Kentucky state Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary will consider so called “red-flag laws.” Though no legislation has been introduced, such laws usually allow for Second Amendment rights to be suspended and firearms seized without due process.
Categories: Gun News

Kimber Teases Almost a Dozen New Handguns for 2020

General Gun News - Fri, 11/15/2019 - 02:41

Kimber has let the cat out of the bag on their 2020 catalog and at least 11 new revolvers and pistols are joining the roster.

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These guns include the new Rapide series semi-custom 1911s in .45ACP, 9mm, and 10mm; three new Mico 9 models; a trio of new K6 revolvers; three new EVO series carry handguns and a Collector edition Raptor II in a distinctive two-tone black and tan scheme.

The Rapide (Black Ice)

The new Rapide comes in a choice of .45ACP, 9mm, and 10mm (Photos: Kimber)

With a name familiar in Europe commonly used for a fast express train– and a popular Aston Martin model– the Rapide is billed by Kimber as a 1911 platform built for speed and is both competition and range ready.

The Rapide runs a match grade barrel w/ DLC coating, has black G10 grips, a full-length guide rod and a V-Cut aluminum trigger factory set at between 4 and 5-pounds.

The pistol is feature-rich including stepped cocking serrations, slide lightening cuts for faster lock time, a DLC coated barrel for extreme durability, flush-fitting extended magwell, and new V-Cut match-grade trigger. It also comes with Tru-Glo TFX Pro Day/Night sights and black G10 grips.

Sporting a two-tone silver and gray finish, they ship with one 8 round Tac-Mag magazine for an MSRP of around $1,500.

New Micro 9 Models

The Micro 9 series of 9mm subcompact carry guns is growing with the new models: a Triari, Amethyst, and a Raptor Collectors Model.

The Micro 9 Triari uses a geometric patterning on the slide and Micarta grips. Carrying fiber optic sights, MSRP will be $788.

Kimber uses their Amethyst PVD finish on other models and has now applied it to the Micro 9 with a purple slide complete with cut scroll engraving and G10 grips. MSRP will be $1,061.

New for 2020 is a series of three different Collector Edition guns sporting the company’s legacy Raptor scaling and a two-tone Tru-Tan and Black KimPro II finish. This is the Micro 9 variant. MSRP will be $951.

New Kimber K6s Wheel Guns

Three new revolvers will be up for grabs from Kimber next year to include a 4-inch Combat, 4-inch Target, and a special Texas edition snub.

Using a 4-inch barrel and a new, larger grip profile, the 6-shot .357 magnum chambered K6s Combat is a full-sized double-action/single-action revolver. Previously, Kimber only marketed this model with a 2- and a 3-inch barrel. MSRP, with walnut finger groove laminate grips and white dot sights, will be $989

Also new in 4-inch barreled K6s models is a DA/SA Target revolver that also has the new, larger grip profile. It sports an adjustable rear and red fiber optic front sight. Like the above model, it is set to retail for $989.

Texas Republic stalwarts could find the Kimber Texas Edition to be their new snubby. Using leaf and vine engraving on a brushed stainless steel frame coupled with grips wearing the state motto and flag, the Texas Edition is a fine tribute to the Lone Star State.

You gotta pay to rock this Texas tribute .357, though, as MSRP is $1,359. (Just don’t tell anyone it is made in New York.)

New EVO Models

Three new Kimber EVO compact metal-framed 9mm pistols will be headed to retailers in 2020. These include two SP Select variants– in stainless and black– as well as a Collector series Raptor two-tone

The EVO SP Select in stainless has ledged white dot sights with a rear U-notch and black nylon grips. Billed as a “no-nonsense choice” in a carry gun, the model will have an MSRP of $599.

Likewise, the EVO SP Select will also come in black at the same price point.

The EVO Collector edition Raptor uses what Kimber bills as its Raptor scaling along with a black and tan two-tone finish. MSRP is $999

Speaking of Raptors, a stainless Raptor II 1911 will also carry the new two-tone Tru-Tan and Black KimPro II finish. Looking at $1524 on this full-sized .45ACP which includes Tactical Wedge night sights.

We’ll bring you more on these in person from SHOT Show in January, where these new models will no doubt be front and center at Kimber’s booth.

SEE GREAT DEALS ON KIMBERS

The post Kimber Teases Almost a Dozen New Handguns for 2020 appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Precision Rifle – Hawk Hill Custom Data Card Holders

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 23:40

I’ve used a lot of different methods but the best way that I’ve found so far is the Rifle Mounted Data Holder from Hawk Hill Custom. It’s actually a quite simple description of an incredibly engineered product.

The post Precision Rifle – Hawk Hill Custom Data Card Holders appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Smith & Wesson Splits from Parent Company, American Outdoor Brands Corp.

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 13:55

The purpose of the spin-off is to enable the management team of each company to focus on its specific strategies...

The post Smith & Wesson Splits from Parent Company, American Outdoor Brands Corp. appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Kimber Teasing Models for 2020: Collectors’ Editions, Carry Guns and More

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 11:16

Kimber America is showing off their expanded 2020 catalog with new and updated models for everyday carry, collecting and sport shooting.

The post Kimber Teasing Models for 2020: Collectors’ Editions, Carry Guns and More appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Franklin Armory Unveils Two New California-Friendly AR-15s

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 11:11

Franklin Armory has two new AR-15-based firearms tailor-fit for the California hunting and sport shooting markets, one chambered in .300 AAC Blackout and the other in .350 Legend.

The post Franklin Armory Unveils Two New California-Friendly AR-15s appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Open Carry ‘Activist’ Arrested in Oklahoma for Carrying Rifle into a Twin Peaks

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 09:27

Police claim Harper’s latest move violated state laws against carrying a rifle into any establishment where alcohol is served. The Oklahoman reports that prosecutors have already decided to pursue a felony charge against Harper.

The post Open Carry ‘Activist’ Arrested in Oklahoma for Carrying Rifle into a Twin Peaks appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Mossberg Announces MC1sc Pistol Consumer Promotion

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 09:11

Consumers can “gear up” with Mossberg’s MC1sc pistol promotion. Subject to promotion details outlined below, purchase any Mossberg MC1sc (subcompact) 9mm pistol and receive a DeSantis® Slim-Tuk holster FREE!

The post Mossberg Announces MC1sc Pistol Consumer Promotion appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

Op-Ed: Outlaw Standard Bullets, Release ‘Recalibrated’ Rounds Forcing Citizens to Buy New Guns

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 08:21

“So here’s what would happen if the manufacture of today’s standard-size rounds were outlawed, and .23, .39 and .46-caliber rounds took their place: Eventually, gun owners would run out of the old ammo, and their weapons would become paperweights,” says Berler.

The post Op-Ed: Outlaw Standard Bullets, Release ‘Recalibrated’ Rounds Forcing Citizens to Buy New Guns appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

How to Speak 1911: Holding Class on the Evolutionary Differences

General Gun News - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 07:22

SEE GREAT DEALS ON 1911s OF EVERY STRIPE

In the past 118 years, there has been lots of development in the basic concept of an M1911 pistol. With that in mind, we are here to help break it down.

John Moses Browning’s original Colt pistol, which was adopted in 1911 by the U.S. Army after extensive testing, was a single-action .45ACP with a 5-inch barrel, 8.5-inch overall length and a weight of about 2.5-pounds. The semi-auto used a 7-shot magazine, had negligible sights, and two frame-mounted safeties. A lanyard ring was standard to help keep the pistol attached to the user should it bounce out of the hand, say while on horseback in a cavalry charge.

In short, the first production type of these M1911 pistols looked much like this:

This Colt 1911 100th Anniversary was a limited production run marking “a century of excellence” in the model. It includes checkered double-diamond walnut grips and the early profile that included a flat mainspring housing. This example, in the Guns.com Vault, has its original centenary box and comes with two seven round-magazines.

The guns proved a hit with the U.S. Army, Navy, and Marines who adopted it to replace older revolver models. Starting in 1912, Colt soon offered it on the commercial market as well as to foreign militaries. By 1914, the Royal Norwegian Army had adopted the pistol while British and Canadian military contracts, with the former chambered in .455, signed around the same time. Argentina and Tsarist Russia soon followed suit with their own orders.

Colt soon marketed the M1911 both to military and commercial markets. Early ads included references to how easy the gun could be used by horse-mounted cavalrymen.

While the first combat use of the Colt GI may have actually been in the hands of Canadians fighting in France in early 1915, U.S. Marines carried the gun with them into battle at Fort Riviere in Haiti the same year while American soldiers had them in 1916 on the Punitive Expedition into Mexico, chasing bandit king Pancho Villa.

This early 1913-made Colt M1911 Government Model was carried in Mexico in 1916 by Mississippi soldier EN Coffey Jr and is currently a museum piece. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

The M1911 and its later M1911A1 descendants would continue to see action in the hands of American service members in the Great War, the Banana Wars, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Cold War, only being (mostly) retired in the late 1980s. During the same time, the standard rifle morphed from the M1903 Springfield to the M1 Garand and later M14 and M16 series.

From 1916 through the late 1980s, the uniforms changed but the M1911 remained a common denominator. (Photos: Library of Congress)

After Great War production by not only Colt but UMC and Springfield Armory, by 1924, the now-veteran M1911 was updated to a new standard, the M1911A1. This included a relief cut to the frame at the trigger to allow a better grip by those with smaller hands/shorter fingers, better sights, an arched mainspring housing, shorter trigger, and extended safety tang.

The new M1911A1 looked more like this:

This GI-style repro, Auto Ordnance’s 1911BKO, closely replicates the look and feel of a WWII-era U.S. military M1911A1. Note the clearance cut to the rear of the trigger as well as the shorter trigger itself. Also, note the curved mainspring housing and extended beavertail grip.

The U.S. military ordered so many M1911A1s during WWII from Colt, USS&S, Remington-Rand, and Singer that the models produced by 1945 were enough to meet the Pentagon’s needs until the Beretta M9 was adopted in 1985. In fact, at least some 90,000 of these vintage pistols are still in arsenal storage at Anniston Army Depot.

Commercially, Colt branched out and produced National Match guns for competition shooters– following in the wake of standard military M1911s which had been customized by Army gunsmiths– and in 1950 began producing what they termed “Commander” series guns. These pistols were shorter, running a 4.25-inch barrel, and lighter by nature of an alloy frame. Similarly, these guns were offered in calibers other than .45ACP, to include .38 Super (which Colt first started chambering commercial 1911s in as early as 1928) and 9mm Luger. Also gone was the lanyard ring.

This circa 1991-made Colt Combat Commander MK IV in our Vault is chambered in 38 Super and has aftermarket Houge wraparound grips. Using a shorter barrel and yielding a lower weight, Commander-style guns chopped the longslide to a more manageable length.

Going shorter than the Commander, “Officer” series Colt 1911s hit the market in 1985. The gun was styled after the short run of M15 General Officer pistols produced at the U.S. Army’s Rock Island Arsenal in the 1970s which were made from chopped-down GI .45s already on hand. Colt ran with the concept and released their own Officer models using 3.5-inch barrels and shorter grips, typically with a 6+1 capacity in .45ACP.

This 1989-production Colt Lightweight Officer model in our Vault sports Pachmayr rubber grips and is chambered in .45ACP.

Internally, 1911 models saw a big change in the 1970s when a collet bushing, which better centered the pistol’s barrel, replaced with the original bushing design, sparking an era of “70 Series” guns. It’s a major difference to 1911 fans, with many preferring the older 70 Series for competition guns.

The “80 Series,” so-called because it was introduced by Colt in 1983, is a more modern development, aimed at increasing drop safety for carry guns through tacking on additional features such as a safety plunger, with the caveat that it adds some extra trigger smush. Many of these guns, if made by Colt, also had a flat mainspring housing like the early pre-1924 M1911 as well as a solid barrel bushing. Likewise, the small ejection port, common on the pistol since it was first adopted in the age of the Model T Ford, was lowered.

To further explain the internal variance between the 70s and 80s, Justin Baldini, product director for Colt, covers the evolutionary process between the two in the below video.

Moving past the Pony, in more recent generations it seems like almost every big semi-auto pistol maker has made inroads to the popular 1911 market. Today, Smith & Wesson, Sig Sauer, Ruger, Springfield Armory, Kimber and Remington all make assorted 1911s domestically while overseas pistol makers like Taurus, Rock Island, and Tisas make no-frills models for import. One sure bet at SHOT Show every year is that a new maker will cannonball into the 1911 pool.

Today may likely be remembered as the golden era of 1911 production, with the guns still bought, sold, carried, and used extensively even though few are used in military or law enforcement currently. These include competition guns, plinkers, carry guns and just plain old collectibles ranging from .22LR models on up.

As far as prices, you can go from a used Rock Island GI Standard for as low as $338 to a Cabot Vintage Classic or Wilson Combat Supergrade that will set you back closer to $4K

Speaking of which, check out this Nighthawk Custom crafted by legendary gunsmith Bob Marvel:

It just doesn’t get any cooler than this when it comes to 1911 carry guns.

SEE GREAT DEALS ON 1911s OF EVERY STRIPE

The post How to Speak 1911: Holding Class on the Evolutionary Differences appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

What Are My Options For Handgun Optics?

General Gun News - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 05:00

Iron sights mounted on the Sig Sauer P320 X. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

CHECK OUT GUNS.COM’S INVENTORY OF OPTICS HERE

Though standard iron sights haven’t changed much over the last several hundred years, technological advances in optics have pushed the envelope for handguns. With an array of options from glow-in-the-dark to electronic, Guns.com is here to break down the various handgun optic styles so you can make the best decision for your shooting style.

IRON SIGHTS

Fiber Optic sights on the Springfield XD-S. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

What many consider “old faithful,” iron sights are a staple on most handguns. While they come in a variety of styles – traditional 3-dot and u-style, for example – there have been some innovations since their inception.

The first major development began with the tritium sight. Allowing shooters to visualize the sights in low light, tritium made engaging targets in dim scenarios easier. In the late 1990s and into the 2000s, tritium was the go-to style for law enforcement and concealed carriers.

The next evolution came by way of fiber optic. Fiber optic sights glow bright — even in normal light. They come in numerous colors and can be installed on narrower sights since they are not radioactive. Today, fiber optic sights dominate the world of upland hunting and competitive shooting.

Iron sight proficiency should be the first step in optics. Long before you toss on a targeting aid or red dot, every gun owner should master the art of shooting with iron sights.

MINIATURE RED DOT

The Trijicon RMR on the FN 509 Midsize MRD. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

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Used in competition shooting for many years, red dot sights have decreased in size over the years allowing more gun owners to concealed carry with these optics. Red dots like the Trijicon RMR and Burris Fastfire make target acquisition faster, affording accurate shots at much further distances.

Red dots also offer an advantage at night, making low light shooting easier. Several red dots on the market even feature light sensors that automatically adjust to the optimal brightness.

The downside to a red dot is two-fold. The first is that most standard holsters don’t accommodate them meaning gun owners will need to opt for a customized rig or one specific to red dot carry.

The second pitfall of the design is that most red dots are battery-driven, meaning gun owners have to remember to change them regularly. Generally speaking, most batteries last two years. A good rule of thumb is to change out batteries on your birthday or anniversary each year, so you know they won’t fail you.

For those opposed to battery-powered red dots, there is an alternative – a Dual Illuminated RMR from Trijicon. Using fiber optics and tritium, the Dual Illuminated RMR collects ambient light to automatically adjust the reticle’s brightness. In no/low light, the tritium does the heavy lifting, illuminating the reticle. Keep in mind that this construction tends is a dimmer solution and more difficult to see when drawing.

Honorable Mention: Laser Accessories

The Beretta BU9 outfitted with a Crimson Trace laser. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Though not an optic in the true sense of the word, lasers do deserve some attention as an aiming aid for novice shooters. These tools help shooters produce the gun on target and improve aiming in life-threatening, high-stress situations. It also acts as a heck of a deterrent against predators. Nothing says, “No thanks” like a red or green dot.

Undermounted lasers, like the LaserLyte Sight Center Mass, slide onto the accessory rail of full-size and most compact pistols. Typically, these are integrated with a flashlight like the Streamlight TLR series.

For subcompact pistols without an accessory rail, grip lasers and trigger guard lasers mount to other areas of the gun. Grip lasers, in particular, offer laser activation with a natural grip of the firearm. Made famous by Crimson Trace, these are said to have a dedicated run time of two hours and are a decent option for those running a full-sized 1911.

Final Thoughts

Whether you adopt fancy new iron sights, a laser aiming accessory or red dot on your pistol, the most important advice to follow is to train. Each device comes with its own limitations and adjustments, so it’s wise to take some time to familiarize yourself with each platform.

Ready to pick up your next pistol optic? Check out Guns.com’s bevy of handgun optic options now!

The post What Are My Options For Handgun Optics? appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Smith & Wesson to Split off into its Own Firearm Company

General Gun News - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 04:25

Smith & Wesson, a name which officially vanished as a company in 2016, is going to stand on its own feet again (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

American Outdoor Brands Corporation announced Wednesday that they intend to split their operation and let S&W stand on its own again.

The historic firearms company, originally founded by Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson in 1852, changed its name to AOBC in 2016 after a suggestion from board members that was approved by stockholders. Now, as noted by the company in a press release this week, the current Board of Directors has unanimously approved splitting the company into separate AOBC and S&W entities with the latter focused on firearms. This will allow AOBC to focus on outdoor products and accessories.

Brands under AOBC will include Caldwell, Crimson Trace, Wheeler, Tipton, Frankford Arsenal, Lockdown, BOG, Hooyman, Schrade, Old Timer, Uncle Henry, Imperial, BUBBA, UST, and LaserLyte. Meanwhile, S&W will license brand their accessories through the company as well. James Debney, current President, and CEO of AOBC, will continue in that role.

As for the rebooted S&W, they will include the iconic 167-year old Smith & Wesson and its associated M&P and Performance Center brands as well as Thompson/Center Arms, and Gemtech. Mark Smith, currently the President of the Manufacturing Services Division of AOBC, will become CEO of the newly independent Smith & Wesson Brands, Inc.

According to statistics from federal regulators, S&W produced 1,032,450 pistols, 207,384 revolvers, and 265,356 rifles at their Springfield, Massachusetts facility in 2017, the most current data available. This puts Big Blue as one of the largest gun makers in the world.

The split is expected to be completed in the second half of the calendar 2020, subject to final approval by AOBC’s Board of Directors as well as customer regulatory and legal review.

The move is intended to allow each company to have a distinct focus and open up investment opportunities based on a wider investor type.

The post Smith & Wesson to Split off into its Own Firearm Company appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Ruger Adds New 300 Blackout AR556 Rifle Model to Catalog

General Gun News - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 00:38

The new .300BLK Ruger uses an 11-inch free-floated aluminum with M-LOK slots slathered on at the 3:00, 6:00 and 9:00 positions with additional slots on the angled faces near the muzzle (Photos: Ruger)

SEE RUGER AR556 MODELS IN STOCK

Connecticut-based Ruger is adding to their AR556 series rifles with the introduction this week of a model chambered for the popular .300 AAC Blackout cartridge.

While Ruger’s AR556 rifle has only previously been offered in .223/5.56-caliber models, and in the AR556 MPR line in .350 Legend and .450 Bushmaster, the Blackout variant is new. Featuring a 16.10-inch cold hammer-forged barrel with a 1-in-7 twist, the new offering has a pistol-length gas system “to reliably function with both the lightest supersonic hunting rounds and heavy, subsonic rounds.”

The rifle also comes standard with an 11-inch aluminum free-float handguard with Magpul M-LOK accessory slots. Suppressor ready, the rifle has 5/8-24TPI muzzle threads capped with a thread protector. In the interest of keeping the user in the right ammo state of mind, both the dustcover and the magazine are marked with the caliber.

The overall length is 33-inches with the six-position M4 style stock fully collapsed and 36.25 with it fully extended. Weight is 6.4-pounds.

For those curious about materials, the barrel is 4140 chrome-moly steel while the receivers are made from 7075-T6 hard-coat anodized aluminum forgings. The 9310 steel bolt is shot-peened and proof-tested inside of an 8620 steel bolt carrier. The inside diameter of the carrier and gas key are chrome plated and the key is staked.

MSRP is $819 but you can expect lower than that when in stock.

For those wanting a bolt-action .300BLK for less scratch, Ruger also markets the American Ranch model in that popular chambering in no less than two models for around $400 smackers.

But What About a Pistol Version?

Looking for something more compact?

The company earlier this year introduced a .300BLK-chambered AR556 pistol. Using an adjustable SB Tactical SBA3 pistol stabilizing brace and a 10.5-inch barrel, the overall length on the 5.8-pound handgun is 27.6-inches. Equipped with a 9-inch aluminum free-float handguard complete with Magpul M-LOK slots, users can install accessories at the 3-, 6-, and 9-o’clock positions. With an MSRP of $949, we currently price it out at closer to $715, in stock. 

SEE RUGER AR556 MODELS IN STOCK

The post Ruger Adds New 300 Blackout AR556 Rifle Model to Catalog appeared first on Guns.com.

Categories: Gun News

Watch Clay & Co. Give Springfield’s New Hellcat Pistol the 10,000-Round Torture Test

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 11/13/2019 - 13:57

Let’s be honest, how often is the average person going to shoot their chosen EDC pistol? A few hundred rounds to make sure it works, and then stuff it in a holster and not think about it again? Maybe even less? How about we turn that on its end and hold that gun you’re staking […]

The post Watch Clay & Co. Give Springfield’s New Hellcat Pistol the 10,000-Round Torture Test appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

Categories: Gun News

JPFO: Red Flag Laws More Dangerous Than Expected

Gun Reports - Special Reports - Wed, 11/13/2019 - 11:41

Americans don't realize that the safety promised by "red flag" laws will be dangerously lost, if red-flagged people become enraged

The post JPFO: Red Flag Laws More Dangerous Than Expected appeared first on GunsAmerica Digest.

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